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Students in the library
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

History and Media

History and Media

History and Media

International Scholarships available

Overview

Your studies will be truly interdisciplinary as you develop expertise in both history and media, and then explore where they intersect.

In your first year, you will study a balance of history and media modules to ensure you develop a strong skillset and knowledge of methodologies in each discipline, such as source analysis and media interpretation. In your second year, you will complete your first interdisciplinary module that will bring your skillset together. In your second and third year, you will be able to drive your studies in a direction that particularly interests you through a wide range of option modules alongside completing a dissertation which explores and celebrates the interconnections between history and media.    

Employability will be embedded throughout your course. You will be confident in your teamwork, project work and ability to work on live briefs and with media professionals and industry partners, and you will have the opportunity to choose career-focused option modules.

This course will see you join a vibrant, research-led academic community in the School of Cultural Studies & Humanities, and you will be taught by active researchers who will guide you in your studies.

You will be in the centre of Leeds and in close proximity to over 18 museums, 10 art galleries, 17 theatres, 4 film production companies and 3 recording studios. Our links with the city and the region enable us to offer modules focusing on urban culture, including field trips that will see you conduct your own original research. Our collaboration with multinational services network PwC granted some of our students exclusive access to the company’s archives to compile a unique collection of letters sent during WWI, which was made into a book. The School’s annual trip to Media City in Salford has given students the chance to tour the BBC and participate in a Q&A session with a BBC staff member such as a journalist or producer. 

The School’s Cultural Conversations speaker series sees staff share their research, and you will have the opportunity to attend guest lectures delivered by leading figures such as TV historian Pam Cox who focused on her Shop Girls series. Our involvement in the Being Human project has seen us work closely with Leeds City Council and Leeds museums, and in past years has focused on subjects such as dystopian fiction and digital stories of the past.    

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

Course Features

  • Explore two subjects in detail on an interdisciplinary course
  • Study dedicated joint honours modules
  • Expert careers service
  • Real-life projects
  • Study abroad option
Transforming our environment - "I use the historical trail of plastic issues to work towards an environmental solution" - Dr Jessica van Horssen, School of Cultural Studies and Humanities
Being Human Festival
Play Being Human Festival Video
Being Human Festival

Entry Requirements

96
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

UCAS Tariff Points: 96 points required. (Minimum Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSEs.

Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 96 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

24 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu. If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website. Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points: 96 points required. (Minimum Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSEs.

Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 96 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

24 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Leeds Beckett University Careers

Careers

Teaching and learning

 
Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
Core Modules

You will study key approaches to researching TV texts, audiences and institutions. Your studies will equip you with the skills to critically apply models from TV studies to the content and consumption of 21st-century TV.

Gain an introduction to the organisation of cultural talk on contemporary BBC radio. You will explore the way cultural talk is administrated to fulfil the BBC?s public purposes.

Develop an understanding of theories and debates in contemporary and 'new' media with a particular focus on the transition from analogue to digital media. You will discuss how people experience, consume and interact with the media forms they encounter in everyday settings.

Develop an understanding of theories and debates in contemporary and 'new' media with a particular focus on the transition from analogue to digital media. You will discuss how people experience, consume and interact with the media forms they encounter in everyday settings.

This module will introduce you to the key themes and historical debates around the emergence of modern Britain, predominantly through a social and cultural lens. You will study the key developments in the era, exploring urbanisation, the class system, popular culture and mass leisure, crime, poverty and social reform through your lectures. Your seminars will focus on source analysis and group work, with emphasis on the core assessment of the module.

Investigate some of the major developments considered to have shaped the modern European world. Your studies will take a thematic approach, looking at topics such as the Enlightenment, political and industrial revolutions, changing class structures and gender relations, and Europe?s often violent encounters with the wider world. You will establish a knowledge-base of key elements of European modernity and a chronological framework for further study.

Core Modules
Swinging Britain: Turned on & Tuned in to the 60s

Gain a detailed overview of research methods including qualitative and quantitative methods. You will understand the ways in which media and cultural studies research can be carried out.

Media: Past & Present, Where & When

Option modules may include:
Applied Humanities: Live-Brief Learning

War, Welfare & Society: Modern Britain, c. 1900-1950

Totalitarianism: State Ideology & Mass Politics in the 20th Century

Slavery & Unfree Labour in the British Empire: Comparative Case Studies

Revolution! Europe 1789-1871

Radicals, Reformers & Revolutionaries in the British Isles, 1760-1922

Landscapes of History

Genocide & the Politics of Memory

Digital History

Bringing the Empire Home, 1851-1914

Thatcher's Britain

Atlantic Revolutions

Study an overview of the main themes of gender history from the late 19th-century to the end of the 20th century, and how cultural constructions of gender identity have changed over that time. You will tackle broad themes such as work, sex, family life, war and politics, and gender in `Western' society (broadly defined as Western Europe (including Britain), North America and Australasia).

Explore some of the features of professional working practices within the media and cultural industry sectors. During this module you will have the opportunity to work on a practice-based project and learn from visiting tutors who are working in areas such as online marketing, publishing, television and radio production. You will also undertake a series of online-workshop reflective tasks covering aspects of a range of professional skills to help you identify your strengths, develop your skills and prepare you for your future career.

This module will see you explore the relationship between young people, crime and media culture. You will approach the study of youth and crime cultures through various historical, theoretical and sociological perspectives and address a range of themes including deviance, resistance, labelling, policing, violence, and crime as a fiction/film genre. You will critically consider these themes in relation to different theories of youth and criminality including delinquency, antisocial behaviour, countercultures, subcultures, club cultures, gangs, drug use and surveillance.

Examine comedy in contemporary media and society. You will explore the analytical and theoretical literature on comedy's purposes and structures before exploring up to three forms of comedy in detail. Firstly, you will study stand-up, secondly the sit-com genre on television and, thirdly romantic comedy in cinema.

Core Modules
Mediating Modernities or Representing Crime & Deviance

You will demonstrate a full range of skills, knowledge, and competencies developed over three years of study. This module provides an opportunity for you to choose and explore a field of study that has particularly engaged your interest.

Option modules may include:

Study the initial spread of communism after 1945 to the collapse of communism in the revolutions of 1989/90. You will explore the onset of the Cold War that led to the division of Europe into `West? and `East? by the `iron curtain?. Your studies will look at the communist monopoly of power and Soviet control over Eastern Europe, and the numerous challenges, upheavals and compromises it underwent between 1945 and 1989. In addition to high-profile popular challenges to the ruling authorities such as the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and the Prague Spring of 1968, this module will also see you consider the various reforms adopted, the increasing role of dissent, and some of the ways that people reacted to, reshaped and resisted communism in their everyday lives.

Study the complex and contested history of 20th-century South Africa by focusing on the development, implementation, and aftermaths of the apartheid system of racial segregation and discrimination. You will study key themes including the aftermath of the 1899-1902 South African (`Boer?) War, the development of a distinctive Afrikaner identity during the 1920s and 30s, changing ideas about race and class, and the formal establishment of apartheid in 1948. Your studies will also consider aspects of social and cultural life under apartheid, for example the so-called `Drum? decade of the 1950s, and the roles and experiences of women, underpinned by a critical consideration of the historiography of gender in South Africa. You will also consider opposition to apartheid, and the formal end of apartheid and white minority rule in 1994. The module will conclude by considering developments in South Africa post-1994, focusing on political transformation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the construction of `new nationalisms? and the writing of new histories.

Consider the question of what constitutes `national identity? and the relationship between cultural identities and the political questions of the day. This module will place the debate in historical context, exploring the emergence of a `United Kingdom? from the acts of union with Scotland and Ireland in 1707 and 1801 respectively to the partial disintegration of this union with the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, to the triumph of devolution under Tony Blair?s New Labour government in 1999 and the EU referendum of 2016. You will have the opportunity to develop your presentation and leadership skills by designing and running one of your seminar sessions as part of a group exercise.

This module will trace the history of British holidaymaking abroad by considering motives for and experiences of travel. You will evaluate changes in how travellers journeyed across two centuries, and explore notions including national identity, racial inequality, coming of age, gender and pilgrimage, which are enabled and challenged by foreign holidaying. Drawing on diaries, travel ephemera, journalism and instructive literature, you will study documents replete with accounts of Britishness, how to behave, what to see and do, the value of empire and the unpredictable nature of foreigners. You will also consider the ways in which encounters with other cultures and peoples are recorded, understood, and justified and in so doing understand how travel documents can reveal as much about British prejudices and perceptions as they reveal about the locations being visited.

Explore the longer history of civil rights in the United States and Canada from the Civil War until today by studying a broad range of people including marginalised populations such as indigenous groups, women, children, and the LGBTQ community. You will study major themes in the history of race, ethnicity, and culture in North America, covering such topics as suffrage, eugenics, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Black Zionism, Red Power, urban ghettos, music, Idle No More, and politics.

Explore the origins of modern environmentalism, examining the development of ideas and beliefs about nature and its conservation on a worldwide scale over the past two centuries. You will study key themes and approaches in the relatively new field of environmental history. Major analytical issues that you will explore include cultural attitudes to nature, changing technologies, the environmental impacts of colonial expansion, increasing industrialization and urbanization, and political and legislative responses to environmental problems.

Study the role that the street has played since the mid-19th century in shaping our lives and identities. This module is concerned with the everyday lives of urban dwellers who used streets for work, leisure, travel, and living in its many legal and illegal ways. You will examine the different users of the street, and the changing representation of the street across our period. In addition to lectures and seminars, you will attend classes off-campus - on the streets and in the arcades with walking tours, in the city's public libraries and in museums. You will be introduced to the variety of primary sources that reveal the personality of a city's streets and activities, around which you will write assignments: photographs, film, maps, newspapers, testimonies, and the buildings and public spaces themselves.

This module will examine the ways in which different kinds of public history - historic buildings and gardens, museums, writers' homes, industrial archaeology - reflect the diverse pasts of people in Britain. You will be equipped with the skills to analyse the processes which help and hinder historical changes, the commercial and policy pressures faced by heritage bodies, and changing legislation such as the 2010 Equalities Act. You will also develop skills in analysing these debates in order to apply your knowledge to particular sites and the interpretations of social history that they offer.

Gain hands-on experience of making public history by working in a small group on a discrete local history project commissioned by an external group or member of academic staff. Training workshops and tutorials will help guide you through the research process and the final outcome will be determined by each group in consultation with their sponsor. This module will reflect a growing interest in local communities about the places where they live, and will provide you with the opportunity to critically reflect on the skills you have developed and the public role of the historian.

Build on your learning from years one and two to complete an in-depth study of genres, their relationship to visual texts, audiences and institutions, and role in everyday life. This module will investigate key studies in film and television and explore ways in which these studies can be linked with broader areas of cultural theory. You will be equipped with the skills to critically analyse models of genre in visual studies and explore the role of genre in making meaning from media texts.

Explore 'race' as a mechanism used to justify oppression, slavery and genocide. But what exactly is `race'? How do racisms manifest and change over time? How can we challenge racial discrimination within the media and wider society? These are some of the important questions that this module critically investigates. You will examine and understand the historical and contemporary significance of `race', ethnicity and culture before beginning to apply your knowledge to different aspects of popular culture such as film, TV, social media, advertising and fashion, music, and sport.

Examine the complex relationship between media and sport at both the industry and audience level. You will understand the role sports coverage plays across print, broadcast and online media in all contexts: local, regional, national and global.

Gain a critical overview of the historical, social, technological and cultural context surrounding digital media such as mobile devices, software apps and computer games. This module explores definitions and interpretations of the term 'digital reality' and how it is used in contemporary culture. You will be encouraged to critically engage with the issues surrounding digitally mediated experiences, especially in relation to interactivity, creativity, community and embodiment.

Gain a critical introduction to celebrity studies and literature on film stardom. It also explores their recent cross-overs, hybridisation and yet continuing distinction in the contemporary world. Media celebrity gives focus to television, radio and new media; the dynamics of contemporary celebrity and the theory, analysis and research necessary to make sense of contemporary media celebrity. Particular use is made of the journal Celebrity Studies to explore the cutting edge of developments in ideas and research and methods. Historical contexts of film stardom are addressed yet the key focus is on recent developments of such stardom and research exploring its contemporary dynamics.

This module draws on recent social theory and on the work of Pierre Bourdieu as a means of examining how identities of class and gender are represented in contemporary media culture. You will use ethnographic case studies to look at the ways audiences consume and interact with lifestyle texts.

Explore the historical connection between popular music and the dissenting voice through a series of indicative case studies beginning with bar-room ballads, soldiers' songs and worksong traditions that include non-Anglophone sources. You will also look at 20th-century modes of dissent including popular song, folk, rock, jazz and soul models. Alongside post-1970 modes of protest, you will look at the use and abuse of sound and technology such as radio and new music media to convey protest.

Career Cartographies

Examine British political culture from 1918 to the present day. You will assess popular participation beyond the ballot box by examining the place of politics in the everyday lives of 20th and 21st century Britons. You will learn through weekly lectures and seminars that will introduce you to a range of relevant sources and build on your existing skills in finding additional digital material. The module will enable you to develop critical approaches in preparation for pursuing your own research interests.

Challenging Gaming Culture

Examine the history of Italy from the beginning of the country's national resurgence during the late 18th century to the present day. You will study the major political, economic, social and cultural developments of this history with a particular focus upon the themes of `continuity' and `change' from one period to another.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
Core Modules

You will study key approaches to researching TV texts, audiences and institutions. Your studies will equip you with the skills to critically apply models from TV studies to the content and consumption of 21st-century TV.

Gain an introduction to the organisation of cultural talk on contemporary BBC radio. You will explore the way cultural talk is administrated to fulfil the BBC?s public purposes.

Develop an understanding of theories and debates in contemporary and 'new' media with a particular focus on the transition from analogue to digital media. You will discuss how people experience, consume and interact with the media forms they encounter in everyday settings.

Develop an understanding of theories and debates in contemporary and 'new' media with a particular focus on the transition from analogue to digital media. You will discuss how people experience, consume and interact with the media forms they encounter in everyday settings.

This module will introduce you to the key themes and historical debates around the emergence of modern Britain, predominantly through a social and cultural lens. You will study the key developments in the era, exploring urbanisation, the class system, popular culture and mass leisure, crime, poverty and social reform through your lectures. Your seminars will focus on source analysis and group work, with emphasis on the core assessment of the module.

Investigate some of the major developments considered to have shaped the modern European world. Your studies will take a thematic approach, looking at topics such as the Enlightenment, political and industrial revolutions, changing class structures and gender relations, and Europe?s often violent encounters with the wider world. You will establish a knowledge-base of key elements of European modernity and a chronological framework for further study.

Core Modules
Swinging Britain: Turned on & Tuned in to the 60s

Gain a detailed overview of research methods including qualitative and quantitative methods. You will understand the ways in which media and cultural studies research can be carried out.

Media: Past & Present, Where & When

Option modules may include:
Applied Humanities: Live-Brief Learning

War, Welfare & Society: Modern Britain, c. 1900-1950

Totalitarianism: State Ideology & Mass Politics in the 20th Century

Slavery & Unfree Labour in the British Empire: Comparative Case Studies

Revolution! Europe 1789-1871

Radicals, Reformers & Revolutionaries in the British Isles, 1760-1922

Landscapes of History

Genocide & the Politics of Memory

Digital History

Bringing the Empire Home, 1851-1914

Thatcher's Britain

Atlantic Revolutions

Study an overview of the main themes of gender history from the late 19th-century to the end of the 20th century, and how cultural constructions of gender identity have changed over that time. You will tackle broad themes such as work, sex, family life, war and politics, and gender in `Western' society (broadly defined as Western Europe (including Britain), North America and Australasia).

Explore some of the features of professional working practices within the media and cultural industry sectors. During this module you will have the opportunity to work on a practice-based project and learn from visiting tutors who are working in areas such as online marketing, publishing, television and radio production. You will also undertake a series of online-workshop reflective tasks covering aspects of a range of professional skills to help you identify your strengths, develop your skills and prepare you for your future career.

This module will see you explore the relationship between young people, crime and media culture. You will approach the study of youth and crime cultures through various historical, theoretical and sociological perspectives and address a range of themes including deviance, resistance, labelling, policing, violence, and crime as a fiction/film genre. You will critically consider these themes in relation to different theories of youth and criminality including delinquency, antisocial behaviour, countercultures, subcultures, club cultures, gangs, drug use and surveillance.

Examine comedy in contemporary media and society. You will explore the analytical and theoretical literature on comedy's purposes and structures before exploring up to three forms of comedy in detail. Firstly, you will study stand-up, secondly the sit-com genre on television and, thirdly romantic comedy in cinema.

Core Modules
Mediating Modernities or Representing Crime & Deviance

You will demonstrate a full range of skills, knowledge, and competencies developed over three years of study. This module provides an opportunity for you to choose and explore a field of study that has particularly engaged your interest.

Option modules may include:

Study the initial spread of communism after 1945 to the collapse of communism in the revolutions of 1989/90. You will explore the onset of the Cold War that led to the division of Europe into `West? and `East? by the `iron curtain?. Your studies will look at the communist monopoly of power and Soviet control over Eastern Europe, and the numerous challenges, upheavals and compromises it underwent between 1945 and 1989. In addition to high-profile popular challenges to the ruling authorities such as the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and the Prague Spring of 1968, this module will also see you consider the various reforms adopted, the increasing role of dissent, and some of the ways that people reacted to, reshaped and resisted communism in their everyday lives.

Study the complex and contested history of 20th-century South Africa by focusing on the development, implementation, and aftermaths of the apartheid system of racial segregation and discrimination. You will study key themes including the aftermath of the 1899-1902 South African (`Boer?) War, the development of a distinctive Afrikaner identity during the 1920s and 30s, changing ideas about race and class, and the formal establishment of apartheid in 1948. Your studies will also consider aspects of social and cultural life under apartheid, for example the so-called `Drum? decade of the 1950s, and the roles and experiences of women, underpinned by a critical consideration of the historiography of gender in South Africa. You will also consider opposition to apartheid, and the formal end of apartheid and white minority rule in 1994. The module will conclude by considering developments in South Africa post-1994, focusing on political transformation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the construction of `new nationalisms? and the writing of new histories.

Consider the question of what constitutes `national identity? and the relationship between cultural identities and the political questions of the day. This module will place the debate in historical context, exploring the emergence of a `United Kingdom? from the acts of union with Scotland and Ireland in 1707 and 1801 respectively to the partial disintegration of this union with the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, to the triumph of devolution under Tony Blair?s New Labour government in 1999 and the EU referendum of 2016. You will have the opportunity to develop your presentation and leadership skills by designing and running one of your seminar sessions as part of a group exercise.

This module will trace the history of British holidaymaking abroad by considering motives for and experiences of travel. You will evaluate changes in how travellers journeyed across two centuries, and explore notions including national identity, racial inequality, coming of age, gender and pilgrimage, which are enabled and challenged by foreign holidaying. Drawing on diaries, travel ephemera, journalism and instructive literature, you will study documents replete with accounts of Britishness, how to behave, what to see and do, the value of empire and the unpredictable nature of foreigners. You will also consider the ways in which encounters with other cultures and peoples are recorded, understood, and justified and in so doing understand how travel documents can reveal as much about British prejudices and perceptions as they reveal about the locations being visited.

Explore the longer history of civil rights in the United States and Canada from the Civil War until today by studying a broad range of people including marginalised populations such as indigenous groups, women, children, and the LGBTQ community. You will study major themes in the history of race, ethnicity, and culture in North America, covering such topics as suffrage, eugenics, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Black Zionism, Red Power, urban ghettos, music, Idle No More, and politics.

Explore the origins of modern environmentalism, examining the development of ideas and beliefs about nature and its conservation on a worldwide scale over the past two centuries. You will study key themes and approaches in the relatively new field of environmental history. Major analytical issues that you will explore include cultural attitudes to nature, changing technologies, the environmental impacts of colonial expansion, increasing industrialization and urbanization, and political and legislative responses to environmental problems.

Study the role that the street has played since the mid-19th century in shaping our lives and identities. This module is concerned with the everyday lives of urban dwellers who used streets for work, leisure, travel, and living in its many legal and illegal ways. You will examine the different users of the street, and the changing representation of the street across our period. In addition to lectures and seminars, you will attend classes off-campus - on the streets and in the arcades with walking tours, in the city's public libraries and in museums. You will be introduced to the variety of primary sources that reveal the personality of a city's streets and activities, around which you will write assignments: photographs, film, maps, newspapers, testimonies, and the buildings and public spaces themselves.

This module will examine the ways in which different kinds of public history - historic buildings and gardens, museums, writers' homes, industrial archaeology - reflect the diverse pasts of people in Britain. You will be equipped with the skills to analyse the processes which help and hinder historical changes, the commercial and policy pressures faced by heritage bodies, and changing legislation such as the 2010 Equalities Act. You will also develop skills in analysing these debates in order to apply your knowledge to particular sites and the interpretations of social history that they offer.

Gain hands-on experience of making public history by working in a small group on a discrete local history project commissioned by an external group or member of academic staff. Training workshops and tutorials will help guide you through the research process and the final outcome will be determined by each group in consultation with their sponsor. This module will reflect a growing interest in local communities about the places where they live, and will provide you with the opportunity to critically reflect on the skills you have developed and the public role of the historian.

Build on your learning from years one and two to complete an in-depth study of genres, their relationship to visual texts, audiences and institutions, and role in everyday life. This module will investigate key studies in film and television and explore ways in which these studies can be linked with broader areas of cultural theory. You will be equipped with the skills to critically analyse models of genre in visual studies and explore the role of genre in making meaning from media texts.

Explore 'race' as a mechanism used to justify oppression, slavery and genocide. But what exactly is `race'? How do racisms manifest and change over time? How can we challenge racial discrimination within the media and wider society? These are some of the important questions that this module critically investigates. You will examine and understand the historical and contemporary significance of `race', ethnicity and culture before beginning to apply your knowledge to different aspects of popular culture such as film, TV, social media, advertising and fashion, music, and sport.

Examine the complex relationship between media and sport at both the industry and audience level. You will understand the role sports coverage plays across print, broadcast and online media in all contexts: local, regional, national and global.

Gain a critical overview of the historical, social, technological and cultural context surrounding digital media such as mobile devices, software apps and computer games. This module explores definitions and interpretations of the term 'digital reality' and how it is used in contemporary culture. You will be encouraged to critically engage with the issues surrounding digitally mediated experiences, especially in relation to interactivity, creativity, community and embodiment.

Gain a critical introduction to celebrity studies and literature on film stardom. It also explores their recent cross-overs, hybridisation and yet continuing distinction in the contemporary world. Media celebrity gives focus to television, radio and new media; the dynamics of contemporary celebrity and the theory, analysis and research necessary to make sense of contemporary media celebrity. Particular use is made of the journal Celebrity Studies to explore the cutting edge of developments in ideas and research and methods. Historical contexts of film stardom are addressed yet the key focus is on recent developments of such stardom and research exploring its contemporary dynamics.

This module draws on recent social theory and on the work of Pierre Bourdieu as a means of examining how identities of class and gender are represented in contemporary media culture. You will use ethnographic case studies to look at the ways audiences consume and interact with lifestyle texts.

Explore the historical connection between popular music and the dissenting voice through a series of indicative case studies beginning with bar-room ballads, soldiers' songs and worksong traditions that include non-Anglophone sources. You will also look at 20th-century modes of dissent including popular song, folk, rock, jazz and soul models. Alongside post-1970 modes of protest, you will look at the use and abuse of sound and technology such as radio and new music media to convey protest.

Career Cartographies

Examine British political culture from 1918 to the present day. You will assess popular participation beyond the ballot box by examining the place of politics in the everyday lives of 20th and 21st century Britons. You will learn through weekly lectures and seminars that will introduce you to a range of relevant sources and build on your existing skills in finding additional digital material. The module will enable you to develop critical approaches in preparation for pursuing your own research interests.

Challenging Gaming Culture

Examine the history of Italy from the beginning of the country's national resurgence during the late 18th century to the present day. You will study the major political, economic, social and cultural developments of this history with a particular focus upon the themes of `continuity' and `change' from one period to another.

Dr Grainne Goodwin
Dr Grainne Goodwin
Course Director

Gráinne’s research focuses on the intersections between colonial encounters (specifically in British India), cultural production and gendered experience in the late-19th century. Her work on critical late-Victorian figures engages with current debates on the relationship between colony and metrople and on colonial networking. Although historically grounded, Gráinne's research is interdisciplinary in approach, utilising and contextualising colonial journalism, novels, business correspondence and print ephemera. This interdisciplinarity is reflected in her most recent project, which uses book history and histories of travel and tourism to analyse Victorian guidebooks and their publishing processes.
Gráinne also edits the Social History Blog - the online resource of the journal Social History - and tweets at @SocHistBlog
g.goodwin@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
0113 81 23136

The degree offers a thorough grounding in skills from each subject area alongside exploring the dynamic connection between History and Media through bespoke interdisciplinary modules. You will develop flexible, critical thinking valued by employers, combined with opportunities for professional practice in the media, heritage and digital history sectors on modules which are engaging, rewarding and real-world responsive.
Being Human Festival
Play Being Human Festival Video
Being Human Festival

Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.
The tuition fee rates for undergraduate applicants, commencing their course in the 2020/21 academic year, are yet to be set at this time by the UK Government. We expect these fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.
The tuition fees for this course, for applicants commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time. These fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.
The tuition fee rates for undergraduate applicants, commencing their course in the 2020/21 academic year, are yet to be set at this time by the UK Government. We expect these fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.
The tuition fees for this course, for applicants commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time. These fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.

Learning spaces

  • Broadcasting Place
    Broadcasting Place

    Officially one of the world’s best tall buildings and a big talking point in Leeds, Broadcasting Place is home to our cultural studies and humanities courses. It offers a space for students to join an academic community that plays an active role in shaping contemporary debates about the future direction of those disciplines.

  • Social learning spaces
    Social learning spaces

    Our social learning spaces typically include PCs, desk space and seating areas, enabling you to study and socialise in a relaxed atmosphere.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

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Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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