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Criminology
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

Criminology

International Scholarships available

Overview

Crime is a vast political and cultural topic that concerns and affects everyone. This course will introduce you to a range of perspectives on crime and its impact on society. As you develop a solid grounding in the theories that sit at the core of criminology, you will cultivate a deeper understanding of our current responses to crime with a view to helping shape more effective policies and legislation in the future. Supported throughout your studies, you will develop the academic, personal and professional skills needed to forge a successful career in a variety of roles, whether you want to work with offenders, the victims of crime or in organisations tasked with reducing offending.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

You will benefit from an exceptional student experience geared to your needs. You will study with a team of academics who are working at the forefront of criminological theories such as policing, prostitution studies, domestic violence, sexual offending, as well as race and crime.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Course Features

  • Part-time study available
  • Real-life projects
  • Study abroad option
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
Transforming how we reform lives: "Education is a crucial component of prison life that universities can support" - Dr Bill Davies and Dr Helen Nichols - School of Social Sciences
BA (Hons) Criminology - Overview
Play BA Criminology - Dr Helen Nichols, Senior Lecturer Video
BA Criminology - Dr Helen Nichols, Senior Lecturer
Play Life in Leeds Video
Life in Leeds
 

Entry Requirements

64
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

Additional Requirements

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website.

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Additional Requirements

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.


More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Vicky Maycock

Careers

Vicky Maycock
Claims Negotiator Fusion Insurance

BA (Hons) Criminology

“My course allowed me to increase my knowledge of fraud and insurance and enter a career I'm really interested in. My job requires me to investigate potential fraudulent claims and I find I'm able to understand them in-depth because of the specialist knowledge I gained on my degree.

Teaching and learning

You will engage in research-led modules looking at public criminology and real world issues that are embedded in sociological and theoretical understanding. You will enhance your critical thinking, academic expertise and personal confidence, so that upon graduation you will be able to choose a career right for you. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.

Explore the core theories and approaches within criminology as well as psychology, and gain a grounding in the criminal justice system. You will also begin to develop your skills in research.
Overall workload
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204 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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996 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
6%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
94%
Core Modules

Build on your understanding and knowledge on a broad foundational level concerning the problem of crime.

Explore the key concepts of criminological theories and the core expressions of explanatory and descriptive criminological theory. Theory is introduced as a sense making tool in the attempt to understand or explain crime.

Learn about the criminal justice process within England & Wales; the actors and institutions that make up this system, along with some underlying social theories.

Study how the concept of crime is socially constructed and allows individuals to categorise behaviour. The meaning of 'crime' is promoted through the use of mediated images. You will examine the way in which our classifications of others are shaped by the sharing of such images and how those categories generate support for the criminalisation process.

Study the social construction of crime and deviance through an examination of the historical, socio-economic and political processes by which particular acts of behaviour, or particular social groups become defined, formally or informally as deviant' and/or 'criminal'.

Understand what it means to be a criminologist. Through a series of lectures on the course team's specialist areas of criminological expertise, students will develop an understanding of criminology as an academic discipline in an interesting and diverse context.

You will develop your knowledge gained in Year One, and be able to analysis and critique the theory. You will study Doing Criminological Research 1, Policing and Social Control, Doing Criminological Research 2 and Punishment. You will choose additional modules according to your career pathway.
Overall workload
Clock icon
207 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
994 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
17%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
13%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
71%
Core Modules

Gain a detailed knowledge of prisons, detention centres, immigration removal centres or any institution that houses people for punishment.

Following on from the part 1 module, focus on quantitative research, looking at the main research methods and key statistical techniques.

Gain an informed and critical exploration of how social control is exercised in society, particularly through policing functions, focusing on elements of change and continuity.

Examine the main types of research design, with a focus on qualitative research, looking at the key techniques as well as ethical and safety considerations.

Option modules may include:

Apply knowledge from the criminology of place to different sorts of urban neighbourhoods and cities to understand the problem of crime.

Gain theoretical and practical understanding of the nature of gender, crime and criminal justice in both domestic and international contexts.

Trace the historical, economic and social contexts wherein 'race' and ethnicity come to be associated with crime, victimisation and disproportion in the criminal justice system. From individual racist violence to state crime, you will examine 'race' and ethnicity in relation to both visible and hidden victimisation and as a source of fears of criminality and threat to social order.

Focus on the study of children, youth and crime by examining patterns of offending and desistance from crime amongst children and young people. You will consider the ways in which notions of childhood and youth offending have been depicted in academic, political and popular discourses and assess the extent to which these various discourses have influenced the response of youth justice systems to address both children as offenders and also the victims of crime.

Study the varying relationships between the media and crime. Using an interdisciplinary approach by drawing on literature and research from criminology, sociology and film and media studies, you will critically examine the ways in which different types of media shape public perceptions of crime and justice, constructs deviance and impacts on responses to crime.

Enlighten and expand your criminological knowledge by learning how the artificial distinction between crimes depending on the status of the criminal has been deliberately constructed through the historical development of law and its application by the state institutions. You will understand the debate about the constitution and definition of what is 'crime'; the socio-legal status of 'crimes' and 'harms'; legal, regulatory and enforcement bias; and questions of power in crime.

Consider the experience of vulnerable people within all areas of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, probation and the prison service. You will engage in critical debates about the criminal justice process and explore how each stage can impact on vulnerable groups including people with mental health difficulties, young people, older people, mothers and people with drug and alcohol dependency.

Explore the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice; how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system; and how responses are increasingly required to show awareness of the reach and impact of harm.

Explore the role that sociology has had in exploring the role, work and symbolism of police work, looking at the broad area of 'police culture'.

Understand the theoretical and applied knowledge underpinning crime science and criminalistics.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Further build upon the expertise with the ability to reflect, evaluate and critique. You will be able to appreciate the achievements and limitations of different approaches, and broaden your knowledge relevant to your chosen career pathway with a range of option modules. You will also undertake a dissertation.
Overall workload
Clock icon
141 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
1059 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
100%
Core Modules

Develop an understanding in contemporary theoretical developments in criminology.

Design and develop a research project in criminology and carry out investigations within a chosen area of interest by collecting existing or generating new data.

Option modules may include:

Study the historical and socially constructed nature of freedom, crime and criminality within the law. You will look at examples of social movements that illuminate how the law itself is a field of contestation, including piracy, file sharing and poll tax rebellion.

Engage with the development of criminal justice policies at a national and global level, drawing on sociological, social policy and socio-legal perspectives. You will investigate the complex inter-relationships between theory, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice. You will be encouraged to evaluate different sources of knowledge about crime and criminal justice, and focus on the role of academic research in shaping and evaluating criminal justice policies.

Further your understanding of theory and analysis of crime and related insecurity by applying already acquired knowledge to the international level by using a comparative, critical and interdisciplinary angle. You will use the case of Europe and the European Union to exemplify the different ways in which crime and insecurity may develop in different contexts and the outcomes of different conceptual understandings of those issues. You will also develop new knowledge in the practical and ideological imperatives behind the development of common European policies, and your ability to apply a global perspective in analysing local processes in crime and social anxiety, and respective developments in criminal justice and security policies.

Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, with a particular focus on social control. You will consider the motivations of both those who purchase sexual services, and the sex workers who cater to these needs both on and off street. To do this, you will look at different theoretical understandings of sex work/prostitution and the way the industry in controlled in different geographical areas.

Examine the social-psychology of aggression and killing, and explore the types of aggression within social contexts i.e. individual face-to-face interactions and also overlooked large scale and sanctioned conflict contexts such as law enforcement, gang contexts and armed conflict settings.

Taught at HMP Full Sutton as part of the Learning Together Network initiative, you will explore the core elements of penology with a specific focus on the philosophy of punishment, the prison as a total institution and prison sociology.

Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.

Explore a range of competing explanations for gendered violence with a particular focus on domestic violence.

Gain a theoretical and practical understanding of the relationship between substances and harm reduction, predominantly through the lens of substance user, abusers, and addicts and how duty of care is related to reducing the risk of substance users, abusers, and addicts.

Look at the cultural and social relationship between tattoos and crime, including the symbolism of tattooing and criminal identity.

Critically examine terrorism, policing and security from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will analyse how terrorism, policing and security have emerged as political and law enforcement priorities and analyse the impact this has had in the respective areas of human rights, civil liberties and the criminalisation of particular groups in society. You will be equipped with the ability to think independently and critically about terrorism, policing and security while at the same time challenging orthodox understandings of the subject matter.

Further your understanding of theory and analysis of crime through a critical analysis of the role of culture and literature.

Look into competing explanations for acts of violent and sexual offending in both domestic and institutional settings, touching on gender, ethnicity and age issues.

Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

Colin Webster
Professor Colin Webster
Professor
Colin Webster is Professor of Criminology. He is a British Academy Prize Winner and is a member of the Editorial Board of the ‘British Journal of Criminology’. He serves as an adviser/consultant to the Youth Justice Board and major research projects.
Studying criminology at our University, you will begin by examining your own feelings and images of crime. We will prepare you to be able to ask critical questions and apply them to practical crime and justice problems in real situations.
BA (Hons) Criminology - Overview
Play BA Criminology - Dr Helen Nichols, Senior Lecturer Video
BA Criminology - Dr Helen Nichols, Senior Lecturer
Play Life in Leeds Video
Life in Leeds
 

Fees & funding

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.
See further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our Bursaries and Scholarships.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year)
  • Study materials - We provide core materials during your studies and you may choose to purchase additional materials. This is not compulsory and will depend upon the projects you undertake.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.
See further information on fees and finance on our Financing Your Studies webpage.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year)
  • Study materials - We provide core materials during your studies and you may choose to purchase additional materials. This is not compulsory and will depend upon the projects you undertake.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Facilities

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Gym and Sports Facilities
    Gym and Sports Facilities

    Keeping fit is easy at Leeds Beckett - our fitness suites are easy to get to, kitted out with all the latest technology and available to all sports members.

  • Clinical Skills Suite
    Clinical Skills Suite

    The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

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