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Jaspreet Chaggar, English masters graduate
Postgraduate course
MA

English Literature

English Literature

English Literature

English Literature

English Literature

International Scholarships available

Overview

You will specialise in either contemporary literature or creative writing. Taught in workshops held on weekday evenings, you will be able to fit your studies around your existing commitments.

Contemporary Literature

Specialise in researching contemporary literature. You will be introduced to a range of recent literary texts in English and develop an advanced, critical understanding of recent debates on the contemporary creative process.

You will be encouraged by expert tutors to develop your skills in close reading, creating and delivering presentations and formal discussions. Modules will explore how contemporary literary studies is a creative process, and will enable you to specialise in topics at the cutting edge of the discipline.   

Your independent project will enable you to experience the process of defining your own area of investigation and conducting in-depth research and writing.

Creative Writing

Study creative writing at an advanced level. From the outset, you will focus on developing particular expertise in the writing process, and the texts and theories you study will enhance your writing practice.

Modules will explore how knowledge of contemporary literary studies can enhance your creativity, and direct your creative practice in areas of particular interest. Expert tutors will support you in developing transferable skills in textual analysis, creating and delivering presentations and discussion. Assessments will establish your creative voice and ability to write for different audiences. 

Supported by your tutor, the independent project module will enable you to pursue your own creative writing project. You will cultivate your advanced planning, written and oral communication skills. 

Leeds Beckett is an established provider of postgraduate contemporary literature education, and you will benefit from the wealth of staff expertise on offer within the School of Cultural Studies & Humanities. Whether your interests lie in the postcolonial world, women's writing or contemporary gothic literature, this course will enable you to study poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates.

You will study at City Campus, right in the heart of Leeds and within easy reach of a wealth of cultural venues and organisations. Our industry connections include publisher Palgrave Macmillan’s Campaign for the Humanities, which advocates scholarship and publishing in this area. Palgrave Macmillan also supports Leeds Cultural Conversations, a series of monthly lunchtime talks organised by the University’s Centre for Culture and the Arts and open to students, staff and the public. 

You will be encouraged to reflect on your motivation for undertaking masters-level study, and you will explore how to apply your learning to achieve personal, professional development or more specific career goals. Your tutor will support you as you gain advanced planning, written and oral communication skills during your independent project.

"You will be introduced to a range of cutting-edge approaches to the study of creative writing, and have the opportunity to explore the relationship between issues in contemporary culture and their relationship with production of the written word. Guided by our course team, you will work on an extended project that reflects your interests and enthusiasms. You will be taught by practising writers and academics who publish and perform their work and are leaders in their fields." Dr Rachel Connor (Course Director).

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

Course Features

  • 24/7 Library
  • Masters loan available
  • TEF Silver Award
  • Part-time study available
  • Expert careers service
Transforming the power of language - "Words are the raw material of culture." - Dr Nasser Hussain, School of Cultural Studies and Humanities
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Entry Requirements

Applicants should either have at least a second class honours degree in the cognate subjects of Humanities, Social Sciences, Law or Human Geography, at least a second class honours degree in a non-cognate subject supported by evidence of an aptitude for the subject applied for, or have equivalent experience or training, normally from within the work environment. All applications should be supported by a reference, either academic or professional; a template can be accessed at this link. All applicants should satisfy our University English language requirements, please access further details at this link

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

IELTS:

IELTS 6.5 overall with no skills below 5.5, achieving 6.5 in the written component of the test, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

Mature Applicants:

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. All students will be considered through the contextual admissions policy described above. If you do not meet the requirements through the contextual admissions policy, we may still be able to make you an offer if you have recent relevant work experience through our ‘Recognition of Prior Learning’ policy. Please ensure that you list both your qualifications and any relevant work experience in your application so that we can consider you under both schemes where applicable..

All applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, for example we accept some Functional Skills Tests. 

Applicants should either have at least a second class honours degree in the cognate subjects of Humanities, Social Sciences, Law or Human Geography, at least a second class honours degree in a non-cognate subject supported by evidence of an aptitude for the subject applied for, or have equivalent experience or training, normally from within the work environment. All applications should be supported by a reference, either academic or professional; a template can be accessed at this link. All applicants should satisfy our University English language requirements, please access further details at this link

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

IELTS:

IELTS 6.5 overall with no skills below 5.5, achieving 6.5 in the written component of the test, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Charlotte Crouch

Careers

Charlotte Crouch
Marketing Assistant Oxford University Press

BA (Hons) English Literature, MA Contemporary Literature

“I can honestly say I would not be where I am today, in a dream job, with a dream company, if it wasn’t for Beckett. The opportunities on offer, within and outside of my studies, were the true stepping-stones to my achievements and career.

Teaching and learning

In your first semester, you will complete three modules that will further develop your knowledge and expertise of English literature before choosing three specialist modules to study in your second semester. You will then complete the Major Project module in your third semester

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download

This module will introduce you to a range of recent developments in the theoretical landscape of English literary studies and also to emerging methodologies of creative criticism. In weekly workshops, you will explore various themes and concerns in the discipline through a series of creative-critical interventions. This module will orient you as a postgraduate-level thinker and writer by sampling some of the main areas of study (theory and method) that will be pursued in-depth in specialist modules, and which might be further explored in your extended project. Besides introducing these subject-specific skills, the module will develop your ability to reflect on and evaluate your learning experience.

In this module you will reflect on the relationship between the study and practice of English literature and the development of professional skills. You write and present an application to undertake a substantial project of your design as preparation for the semester 3 module, Major Project. Introductory workshops will outline objective-setting in a professional context as well as methodologies of reflective practice. Initial project design will be undertaken in consultation with a tutor, before you organise an event to present your project plans, and then complete a formal application, drawing upon prior knowledge and skills identified and refined in this module.

Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

This module will enable you to explore at an advanced level the new and diverse forms of Gothicism that have begun to take shape in the new millennium and how they relate to earlier forms of the Gothic mode going back over two centuries. You will consider, and seek critically to interrogate, key shifts in the Postmillennial Gothic’s treatment of traditional Gothic tropes, themes and modes of representation – including monstrosity and its cultural meanings; madness; apocalypse; representations of the past and of the future; forms of political and social estrangement, ‘othering’ and oppression; parodic and satirical re-workings of earlier Gothic texts. You will work with literary texts (novels, short stories, poetry) from across cultures and you will examine the migration of the Gothic mode into new postmillennial media: computer gaming; online Gothic anime and Manga serialisations originating in Korea and Japan; interactive ‘Apps’; Gothic dramas streamed by new and highly influential global corporate production and distribution networks: Netflix, Amazon etc. You will acquire an advanced critical understanding of the multiple meanings of ‘Gothicism’ in the Postmillennial period; the literary historical development of the Gothic prior to the contemporary moment; the global political, economic and social contexts that have shaped new forms of Gothicism; the diverse theoretical perspectives that open up fresh understandings of the Gothic mode in the new millennium.

Since the millennium, novels that imagine the end of the world as we know it have become increasingly popular. This module will examine a number of contemporary apocalyptic fictions in the context of the much wider apocalyptic trend amongst contemporary philosophers, political commentators and journalists. You will begin by tracing the history of apocalyptic thinking in western culture. You will then examine the key issues that motivate the apocalypse in contemporary fiction, including climate change, globalisation, corporatisation and the unchecked excesses of technoscience. The module will also assess the extent to which issues of difference and social inequality, including ‘race’, ethnicity, sexuality and gender inflect imaginative visions of the apocalypse in fiction in different ways.

The ethos of this module centres on aspects of socio-cultural diversity in relation to voice, and how this shapes the writer’s perceptions of their emerging voice. The module will promote both awareness and agency by asking you to ‘write back’ to influential texts in which elements of oppression or exclusion have been identified. You will then be guided in creatively critiquing both literary and non-literary texts. The module will use creative practices to expose key questions in relation to marginalised identities and its emphasis on the production of non-fiction texts will expand the range of writing forms with which you engage on the course.

Rather than viewing ‘place’ as mere backdrop, this module will encourage you to bring it into the fore as an active ingredient in the creative process. As well as discussing what role place characteristically plays in different forms and genres, the module will utilise a range of different approaches to place/space, understanding these concepts within cultural and theoretical contexts. You will emerge from the module with new understanding of key conceptual, ethical and theoretical issues/opportunities involved in depicting space, place and environment in literary texts, and new abilities to experiment with space, place and environment in creative practice. You will plan, implement and theorise a creative intervention into space/place/environment in any form or genre, and construct persuasive arguments about this work.

This module will introduce you to range of techniques, processes, concepts, and approaches relating to rewriting, adapting and reimagining. In the space of the workshop, you will develop advanced skills of creative response and collaborative working crucial to the development of their learning in creative writing at masters level.

This module will enable you to undertake a sustained piece of research, or research and creative practice, in English Literature on a topic selected by themselves. Your progress will be overseen by an individual tutor. The particularities of the project, including its topic and its balance of creative, critical, and reflective writing, will be determined in tutorial discussion.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download

This module will introduce you to a range of recent developments in the theoretical landscape of English literary studies and also to emerging methodologies of creative criticism. In weekly workshops, you will explore various themes and concerns in the discipline through a series of creative-critical interventions. This module will orient you as a postgraduate-level thinker and writer by sampling some of the main areas of study (theory and method) that will be pursued in-depth in specialist modules, and which might be further explored in your extended project. Besides introducing these subject-specific skills, the module will develop your ability to reflect on and evaluate your learning experience.

In this module you will reflect on the relationship between the study and practice of English literature and the development of professional skills. You write and present an application to undertake a substantial project of your design as preparation for the semester 3 module, Major Project. Introductory workshops will outline objective-setting in a professional context as well as methodologies of reflective practice. Initial project design will be undertaken in consultation with a tutor, before you organise an event to present your project plans, and then complete a formal application, drawing upon prior knowledge and skills identified and refined in this module.

Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

This module will enable you to explore at an advanced level the new and diverse forms of Gothicism that have begun to take shape in the new millennium and how they relate to earlier forms of the Gothic mode going back over two centuries. You will consider, and seek critically to interrogate, key shifts in the Postmillennial Gothic’s treatment of traditional Gothic tropes, themes and modes of representation – including monstrosity and its cultural meanings; madness; apocalypse; representations of the past and of the future; forms of political and social estrangement, ‘othering’ and oppression; parodic and satirical re-workings of earlier Gothic texts. You will work with literary texts (novels, short stories, poetry) from across cultures and you will examine the migration of the Gothic mode into new postmillennial media: computer gaming; online Gothic anime and Manga serialisations originating in Korea and Japan; interactive ‘Apps’; Gothic dramas streamed by new and highly influential global corporate production and distribution networks: Netflix, Amazon etc. You will acquire an advanced critical understanding of the multiple meanings of ‘Gothicism’ in the Postmillennial period; the literary historical development of the Gothic prior to the contemporary moment; the global political, economic and social contexts that have shaped new forms of Gothicism; the diverse theoretical perspectives that open up fresh understandings of the Gothic mode in the new millennium.

Since the millennium, novels that imagine the end of the world as we know it have become increasingly popular. This module will examine a number of contemporary apocalyptic fictions in the context of the much wider apocalyptic trend amongst contemporary philosophers, political commentators and journalists. You will begin by tracing the history of apocalyptic thinking in western culture. You will then examine the key issues that motivate the apocalypse in contemporary fiction, including climate change, globalisation, corporatisation and the unchecked excesses of technoscience. The module will also assess the extent to which issues of difference and social inequality, including ‘race’, ethnicity, sexuality and gender inflect imaginative visions of the apocalypse in fiction in different ways.

The ethos of this module centres on aspects of socio-cultural diversity in relation to voice, and how this shapes the writer’s perceptions of their emerging voice. The module will promote both awareness and agency by asking you to ‘write back’ to influential texts in which elements of oppression or exclusion have been identified. You will then be guided in creatively critiquing both literary and non-literary texts. The module will use creative practices to expose key questions in relation to marginalised identities and its emphasis on the production of non-fiction texts will expand the range of writing forms with which you engage on the course.

Rather than viewing ‘place’ as mere backdrop, this module will encourage you to bring it into the fore as an active ingredient in the creative process. As well as discussing what role place characteristically plays in different forms and genres, the module will utilise a range of different approaches to place/space, understanding these concepts within cultural and theoretical contexts. You will emerge from the module with new understanding of key conceptual, ethical and theoretical issues/opportunities involved in depicting space, place and environment in literary texts, and new abilities to experiment with space, place and environment in creative practice. You will plan, implement and theorise a creative intervention into space/place/environment in any form or genre, and construct persuasive arguments about this work.

This module will introduce you to range of techniques, processes, concepts, and approaches relating to rewriting, adapting and reimagining. In the space of the workshop, you will develop advanced skills of creative response and collaborative working crucial to the development of their learning in creative writing at masters level.

This module will enable you to undertake a sustained piece of research, or research and creative practice, in English Literature on a topic selected by themselves. Your progress will be overseen by an individual tutor. The particularities of the project, including its topic and its balance of creative, critical, and reflective writing, will be determined in tutorial discussion.

Creative Criticism

Literature in Practice

Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Postmillennial Gothic

Imagining India

You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Contemporary Apocalyptic Fictions

Voice & Diversity

Space-place-environment

Rewritings

Contemporary Caribbean Writing

Major Project

Creative Criticism

Literature in Practice

Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Postmillennial Gothic

Imagining India

You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Contemporary Apocalyptic Fictions

Voice & Diversity

Space-place-environment

Rewritings

Contemporary Caribbean Writing

Major Project

Professor Susan Watkins
Professor Susan Watkins
Professor

Susan Watkins is Professor in the School of Cultural Studies and Humanities and Director of the Centre for Culture and the Arts. She is an expert in contemporary women's fiction and feminist theory.

The contemporary pathway is for those who are fascinated by the literature of our contemporary moment, and also want to trace the histories and cultural contexts that created that moment. The English team at Leeds Beckett includes scholars who are leading the field and working on the latest thinking about contemporary literature and new critical approaches to it. Our areas of expertise include the contemporary Gothic, post-apocalyptic fiction, post 9/11 writing, neo-liberalism in the contemporary American novel, and new writing from India and the African diaspora.
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Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2020/21 is £6500. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees

Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following is also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: such as 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2020/21 is £13000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees

Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following is also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: such as 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Studying part-time gives you the flexibility to learn at your own pace. Because of this, our tuition fees are calculated using credit points. Each module you study has a credit point value. Most modules have a credit point value of 20. The tuition fee for students entering in in 2020/21 on this course is £722.20 for each 20 credit point module. For modules with a different credit point value their cost can be calculated by multiplying the credit value of the module by the cost per credit point of £36.11. The amount you will pay may increase each year in line with inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees

Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following is also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: such as 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Part-time rates for international students are not automatically displayed as there are specific visa requirements which generally limit students to study in the UK on a full-time basis. Should you wish to query your visa status you can contact Tier4 Compliance@leedsbeckett.ac.uk. If you are able to study on a part-time basis please contact fees@leedsbeckett.ac.uk for further information on course fees.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees

Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following is also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: such as 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £5950. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £13000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

Studying part-time gives you the flexibility to learn at your own pace. Because of this, our tuition fees are calculated using credit points. Each module you study has a credit point value. Most modules have a credit point value of 20. The tuition fee for students entering in in 201920 on this course is £661 for each 20 credit point module. For modules with a different credit point value their cost can be calculated by multiplying the credit value of the module by the cost per credit point of £33.05. The amount you will pay may increase each year in line with inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Part-time rates for international students are not automatically displayed as there are specific visa requirements which generally limit students to study in the UK on a full-time basis. Should you wish to query your visa status you can contact Tier4 Compliance@leedsbeckett.ac.uk. If you are able to study on a part-time basis please contact fees@leedsbeckett.ac.uk for further information on course fees.

Learning spaces

  • 24/7 Library and learning spaces
    24/7 Library and learning spaces

    Our online library is a vital resource, allowing you to access tens of thousands of digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals, subject-specific web pages and databases, from any machine anywhere in the world. Our split-site Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, so you will always find space to work, whether that is in our silent study areas or social learning spaces.

  • Social Learning Spaces
    Social Learning Spaces

    You will have access to plenty of collaborative learning spaces, such as the newly renovated student hub, ideal for discussions and group work.

  • Broadcasting Place
    Broadcasting Place

    Officially one of the world’s best tall buildings and a big talking point in Leeds, Broadcasting Place is home to our cultural studies and humanities courses. It offers a space for students to join an academic community that plays an active role in shaping contemporary debates about the future direction of those disciplines.

Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

Open Days & Virtual Events Arrow Right Icon Explore Leeds Arrow Right Icon Accommodation Arrow Right Icon
Postgraduate Study - Application Steps

Once you've decided what course to study, here is a step-by-step guide of what to do next.

  • 1
    EXPLORE
    Explore your full range of options on our Online Prospectus at courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
    Call us on +44(0)113 812 3113 or email admissionsenquiries@leedsbeckett.ac.uk if you have any questions. International students can phone +44(0)113 812 1111 or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
  • 2
    POSTGRADUATE AND RESEARCH OPEN DAY
    Visit us for a Postgraduate and Research Open Day to speak to teaching staff and students, see our facilities and find out more about your chosen course. Alternatively, watch our online open day or register for a Virtual Q&A and ask our friendly staff any questions you may have.
  • 3
    APPLY

    Apply directly to us via our online application site *.

    * Exceptions to this are:

    • Teacher Training (PGCE & EYTS)
    • PG Dip Legal Practice PG Dip Law
    • Chartered Institute of PR (CIPR): Advanced Certificate & Advanced Diploma
    • MA Social Work
    • MA Art Psychotherapy
    • PGCert/PGDip/MA Play Therapy
  • 4
    YOUR OFFER
    Receive your offer - remember, the sooner you apply the sooner an offer can be made. Please note that certain courses do have set application deadlines so you should check before applying. Some courses may require you to attend an interview or submit a portfolio before an offer can be made.
  • 5
    SEND US YOUR RESULTS
    If we make you a conditional offer, send us your results as soon as you have these so we can confirm your place.
  • 6
    ACCOMMODATION
    Apply for our university accommodation if you need it.
  • 7
    INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
    Check visa regulations and apply for your CAS number if necessary.
  • 8
    FEES & FUNDING
    Discover more about your funding options and set up your fee payments.
  • 9
    ONLINE REGISTRATION & ENROLMENT
    Receive your online registration and enrolment information.
  • 10
    WELCOME WEEK
    Attend Welcome Week and begin your course.
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