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English & History
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

English & History

International Scholarships available

Overview

Who changed literature? Who made history? Who did both? We need innovative thinkers who thrive on the intellectual dynamic between English literature and history. Investigate the relationship between history and literature across a range of topics, texts and periods while developing your skills in creative and critical analysis.

Study modules from our English Literature and History degrees alongside tailor-made offerings that explore methods and ideas spanning both subjects. You will graduate with enhanced transferable skills in writing, research and critical thinking which are highly valued by employers.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.
We celebrate students and staff with a true passion for the Arts and Humanities.

Through inspired teaching and intellectual debate, plus day to day interaction with award-winning authors and playwrights, a rolling programme of media industry professionals, published lecturers and world-renowned researchers, we will nurture your passion by developing your creative and critical thinking.

Then we will open your mind to the wide range of opportunities to pursue a career you love, be it anything from writing and teaching, through journalism and copywriting, business and marketing, to research and publishing.

Leeds is the Northern heart of culture and the arts. Your campus sits in the very centre of the city, surrounded by over 18 museums, 10 art galleries, 17 theatres, 4 film production companies and 3 recording studios (plus the odd bar, restaurant and club!). We work directly with Leeds museums and galleries and many regional events, including the Ilkley Literature Festival and the Leeds West Indian Carnival.

Our research and teaching explore a diversity of topics, from South Africa under Apartheid to the cultural impact of the LGBTQ community and from on-line racism in football to 21st century genres. We?re also very hands-on: from regular conferences, seminars and events organised by our Centre for Culture and the Arts, to collaborations with institutes and cultural organisations.

Take a look at the opportunities we provide to study abroad.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website
92.3%
Student Satisfaction
Student Satisfaction*
*National Student Survey 2017

Course Features

  • Study abroad option
  • Part-time study available
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
  • 100% of graduates from the course are in work or further study six months after graduating (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2015-16).
  • 100% of students said staff made the subject interesting and that the course was intellectually stimulating (National Student Survey 2017).
  • 100% of students said their course provided them with opportunities to apply their learning and thought the course enabled them to bring information and ideas together from different topics (National Student Survey 2017).
Play BA (Hons) English and History - Dr Helen Dampier, Senior Lecturer Video
BA (Hons) English and History - Dr Helen Dampier, Senior Lecturer
Play Being Human Festival Video
Being Human Festival
Play Being Human Festival City Maps Video
Being Human Festival City Maps
Play Being Human Festival City Tour Video
Being Human Festival City Tour

Entry Requirements

96
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
UCAS Tariff Points: 96 points required. (Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 96 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.
International Baccalaureate: 24 Points
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website.

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points:96 points required. (Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 96 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.
International Baccalaureate: 24 Points
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.


More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Lauren Ingleby

Careers

Lauren Ingleby
Visitor Liaison Harewood House

BA (Hons) English & History

“Through my course I discovered that the best way to bring history to life is to relive it where it happened. History is my passion and my job gives me the opportunity to bring the past to life for the public and visiting school children.

Teaching and learning

Your English modules will see you study a variety of texts, paying particular attention to non-canonical works. The history portion of your course will explore four strands: British, European, Wider World History, and Working with History. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study – the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
Download Course Spec Download
Your three English modules will give you a firm grounding in techniques and genres such as literary analysis and poetry. Through your three historical survey modules you will stufy topics including The Emergence of Modern Europe and 20th-Century Europe.
Overall workload
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273 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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983 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
20%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
5%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
75%
Core Modules

Gain an introduction to major political, social, and cultural developments in 20th-Century Europe. You will adopt thematic and comparative approaches to the study European societies to build a useful framework for understanding modernity to post-modernity during this period. You will study a number of key areas including World War One, interwar Europe, World War Two and the Holocaust, post-war European population movements, reconstruction and integration, Cold War Europe and the 'Atomic Age', European society and culture in the 'age of affluence'.

Study comic drama produced in the period from the Renaissance to the Restoration. This module will provide a framework through which these texts can be interpreted and understood in relation to the historical moments in which they were produced. You will explore the relationship between the comedies and aspects of elite and popular cultures, and you will consider the relationship of these plays to the practices of carnival, festive and masquerade in early modern England.

Investigate some of the major developments considered to have shaped the modern European world. Your studies will take a thematic approach, looking at topics such as the Enlightenment, political and industrial revolutions, changing class structures and gender relations, and Europe?s often violent encounters with the wider world. You will establish a knowledge-base of key elements of European modernity and a chronological framework for further study.

You will be introduced to the study of narrative by examining a series of short narratives from a given period in literary history.

Study a wide variety of poetry written in English and gain an understanding of the development of poetry from the Shakespearean period through to contemporary times. You will be better acquainted with a range of poetry in order to develop your sense of literary history. You will study critical and theoretical perspectives and interpretive tools to enable you to approach the reading and analysis of poetry with confidence.

This module will introduce you to the key themes and historical debates around the emergence of modern Britain, predominantly through a social and cultural lens. You will study the key developments in the era, exploring urbanisation, the class system, popular culture and mass leisure, crime, poverty and social reform through your lectures. Your seminars will focus on source analysis and group work, with emphasis on the core assessment of the module.

You will be encouraged to engage in interdisciplinary working across your two core and four option modules. You will engage with, examine and interpret literary and historical theoretical models.
Overall workload
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258 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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987 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
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12 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
13%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
5%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
82%
Core Modules

Your studies will be divided into two parts. In the first you will study the varied approaches historians use to study the past. In the second, you will be supported by a member of staff to develop a viable dissertation proposal.

On this interdisciplinary module, you will study the development of detective fiction and the changing representations of criminality in the Victorian era through to the interwar period of the twentieth century. You will read key texts by authors including Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie.

Option modules may include:

Gain an understanding of late 20th-Century Britain by exploring some of the key themes in its social and cultural history during the period c.1979-1990. You will develop skills in working with primary and secondary sources, and the ability to communicate ideas effectively.

Develop an understanding of early 20th-century British history by exploring some of the key themes in social and cultural history during the period c.1900-1950. You will hone your skills in three key areas: identification and engagement with secondary sources, identification and analysis of primary sources and the ability to communicate ideas both orally and in writing.

This module covers the key movements for political change in the British Isles over the period from the Wilkesite protests of the 1760s to the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922. Your studies will encompass movements such as those mounted by Christopher Wyvill?s Yorkshire Association, radical movements for universal suffrage such as Chartism and violent action against the state and its functionaries such as the Despard Conspiracy, and revolutionary movements, including Irish Republicanism.

Study an overview of the main themes of gender history from the late 19th-century to the end of the 20th century, and how cultural constructions of gender identity have changed over that time. You will tackle broad themes such as work, sex, family life, war and politics, and gender in `Western' society (broadly defined as Western Europe (including Britain), North America and Australasia).

Engage with a comparative perspectives by considering the connections between revolutionary upheavals in North America, Europe and Latin America. This module will emphasise the ways these revolutions were linked and what they had in common. You will explore a number of key themes including race, political relationships, national identity, class and gender through which to evaluate the similarities and differences between revolutions in America, France and Haiti.

This module will cover themes of change in European history during the `Age of Revolutions', namely the period between the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789 to the completion of national unifications in Italy and Germany by 1871. You will focus on the development of new political ideologies, the impact of economic and social and economic change, the advance of communications technology, cultural conflict, and reflections of all of these themes through the art and architecture of the period.

Explore the ideological challenges posed by communism and fascism to liberal democracy in the 20th century. In particular, you will focus on the `Age of Extremes' (1918-1991), in which authoritarian ideologies of the left and right embraced mass politics and offered alternative visions of social and political organisation that directly challenged the hegemony of the liberal-capitalist order. This module will enable you to question the usefulness of totalitarianism as a concept to understanding this era in history.

Study how labour in the British empire was extracted by coercive means through four main case studies: slave societies in the Caribbean, colonial Indian indentureship, slavery at the Cape between the 17th and 19th centuries and forced labour in West Africa during the interwar and World War II period. You will examine the development of slave systems and other mechanisms to compel colonised people to work, the economic and ideological rationale behind transitions to enslaved labour, the ways in which slaveholders, planters and overseers controlled workers and the many ways in which workers resisted their bondage. This module also considers the creation of new identities and cultures amongst slaves and other unfree labourers, the different experiences of men and women, and the rise of British anti-slavery from the 18th up to the mid-20th century.

Engage with historiographical debates which challenge long-held historical assumptions of an imperial/metropolitan divide. You will examine the role of the empire in British social, political, cultural and material life and how the relation between metropole and colony was experienced and expressed in everyday practices, such as consumer culture and popular entertainment. You will use a wide range of primary sources including visual, media and literary material. This module will explore and problematise how the empire is presented and preserved today by encouraging you to reflect critically on how histories, objects and perceptions of empire are presented in the 21st century in institutions where collections of empire are displayed.

Examine the origins, implementation and aftermaths of genocide by engaging extensively with historiography and contemporary debates about victims and perpetrators, the `grey zone? of resistance, collaboration and survival, and particularly the politics of remembrance. This module will also encourage you to critically examine why past genocides, such as the Nazi Holocaust, have assumed such importance in contemporary society. You will engage with debates about the politics of commemoration requiring the use of theory and empirical evidence and consider the language and history of remembrance in relation to genocide.

Develop your historical research skill set through online lab sessions in which you will apply your learning from lectures. You will explore how to create a website using a content management system, how to use digital libraries such as JSTOR, how to use apps to understand specific landscapes of enquiry over time and the possibilities presented by virtual reality for research and research communication.

Study how different media, including visual art, material culture and literary fiction, shaped and interpreted the modern British landscape. Reflecting recent trends in social and cultural history, you will look at the history of material forms, from water to electricity, and of the senses through which the environment has been apprehended. You will then consider the conservation and the place of landscape in contemporary policy-making.

Explore issues of context - what it is, where it comes from and what its relation is to other forms of information. You will develop strong research skills by taking a theoretically informed approach to contextual study of literature.

Gain an understanding of `postcolonial? literature and the conceptual and critical vocabulary you will need to read and analyse texts from formerly colonised regions of the world.

Explore the emergence and development of the Romantic movement in Britain between 1780 and 1830 through engaging with a range of literature across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. You will analyse Romanticism using theoretical and critical methods.

Study a selection of literature of the 20th century and examine how literature writes about some of the key events of the for example as WWI, WWII, post-war austerity and the Cold War. You will understand key terms such as modernism and postmodernism. You will consider texts that focus on the idea of alienation and dystopia and the place of the individual in society and explore why writers of the period turned to imagining the future in order to express their concerns with their present moments. In preparation for writing your dissertation, you will be guided through the process of developing your own research question to become a more independent learner.

Understand the way that humanities disciplines and skills intersect with a range of professional working contexts. You will complete 36 hours of live-brief learning to gain first-hand experience of planning, delivery and evaluating a professional working brief set by an industry partner organisation. You will work as a group across 10 weeks alongside a tutor to design, deliver, present and evaluate the brief to industry standards. As well as conducting a reflective case study of your brief, you will complete a CV, cover letter, LinkedIn profile and undertake a recorded mock interview.

You will research and write your year-long dissertation in addition to two core modules. You will tailor your studies through three option modules supported by expert academic staff.
Overall workload
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208 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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1043 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
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5 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
100%
Core Modules

Examine the representation of Elizabeth I and of the Elizabethan period in texts from the 16th to the 21st century. You will begin by considering the depiction of Elizabeth during her lifetime in texts including portraits, drama, poetry and courtly entertainments and the ways in which these contribute to the formation of narratives which (re)fashion her gender identity and provide a site where her relationships with her subjects were constructed, negotiated and contested. You will then consider the ways in which the identity and image of the queen and the historical moment associated with her are mediated and re-inscribed in recent historical biography, historiography, screen narratives including historical documentary and heritage cinema, modernist biographical pastiche, historical fiction and fantasy.

You will demonstrate a full range of skills, knowledge, and competencies developed over three years of study. This module provides an opportunity for you to choose and explore a field of study that has particularly engaged your interest.

Option modules may include:

Gain an understanding of the cultural connections between Africa and the African Diaspora through the analysis of a range of key literary works. Through close reading and analysis of the modules primary texts and the interrogation of postcolonial theoretical debates, you will be encouraged to explore the intersections and tensions between issues of race, gender, identity, education and language within the contexts of slavery, colonialism, migration and exile.

Engage with debates about masculinity which took place during the long 18th century. You will read a range of literary texts, including novels and poetry and focus on important models of 'manliness' which were prevalent in the period. This module will encourage you to situate texts in relation to historical context, and also to engage with theory.

Explore the development of the Gothic from its literary origins in the mid-18th century through to the mid-20th century. You will analyse the literary and cultural properties of Gothicism as it has shifted and diversified over this period and you will be encouraged to engage with Gothic novels alongside a range of forms across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. This module will also introduce you to theoretical and critical methods of analysing the Gothic such as Freud?s concept of the uncanny and Julia Kristeva?s theory of abjection.

Study a selection of American plays from the 1920s to the 1990s, focusing on the ways in which they dramatise the relationship between public issues and private concerns. This module investigate the ways in which American drama stages the enduring conflict between the search for individual happiness and the making of social and political bonds in a society based on an ideology of competitive individualism. The module will provide opportunities to refine your skills in collaborative work, oral presentation, guided research, and independent study.

Understand how writers and film-makers have imagined city spaces and identities in a range of postcolonial locations. Through an exciting range of literary and cinematic texts, and drawing on theories of urban space, place, and postcoloniality, you will explore issues that are of central importance to the world many of us live in today, including migrant labour, asylum seekers, refugees, and illegal immigrants; crime, conflict, and policing; memory, history, and urban space; class, gender, race, sexuality, and the postcolonial city amongst others.

Examine the relationships between writing and the Northern Ireland conflict (1966?1998). You will consider the ways in which writing responds to serious and prolonged political and social crisis and how it offers insights into issues normally considered to be purely within the realm of party or national politics. This module will enable you to understand the way literature negotiates the tensions between the demands of artistic integrity and independence and the pressures to speak out or to contribute towards the resolution of violent political division. You will also look at texts produced after 1998, a time of somewhat uncertain `peace and reconciliation?.

Study the complex and contested history of 20th-century South Africa by focusing on the development, implementation, and aftermaths of the apartheid system of racial segregation and discrimination. You will study key themes including the aftermath of the 1899-1902 South African (`Boer?) War, the development of a distinctive Afrikaner identity during the 1920s and 30s, changing ideas about race and class, and the formal establishment of apartheid in 1948. Your studies will also consider aspects of social and cultural life under apartheid, for example the so-called `Drum? decade of the 1950s, and the roles and experiences of women, underpinned by a critical consideration of the historiography of gender in South Africa. You will also consider opposition to apartheid, and the formal end of apartheid and white minority rule in 1994. The module will conclude by considering developments in South Africa post-1994, focusing on political transformation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the construction of `new nationalisms? and the writing of new histories.

Examine British political culture from 1918 to the present day. You will assess popular participation beyond the ballot box by examining the place of politics in the everyday lives of 20th and 21st century Britons. You will learn through weekly lectures and seminars that will introduce you to a range of relevant sources and build on your existing skills in finding additional digital material. The module will enable you to develop critical approaches in preparation for pursuing your own research interests.

This module will trace the history of British holidaymaking abroad by considering motives for and experiences of travel. You will evaluate changes in how travellers journeyed across two centuries, and explore notions including national identity, racial inequality, coming of age, gender and pilgrimage, which are enabled and challenged by foreign holidaying. Drawing on diaries, travel ephemera, journalism and instructive literature, you will study documents replete with accounts of Britishness, how to behave, what to see and do, the value of empire and the unpredictable nature of foreigners. You will also consider the ways in which encounters with other cultures and peoples are recorded, understood, and justified and in so doing understand how travel documents can reveal as much about British prejudices and perceptions as they reveal about the locations being visited.

Explore the longer history of civil rights in the United States and Canada from the Civil War until today by studying a broad range of people including marginalised populations such as indigenous groups, women, children, and the LGBTQ community. You will study major themes in the history of race, ethnicity, and culture in North America, covering such topics as suffrage, eugenics, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Black Zionism, Red Power, urban ghettos, music, Idle No More, and politics.

Study the initial spread of communism after 1945 to the collapse of communism in the revolutions of 1989/90. You will explore the onset of the Cold War that led to the division of Europe into `West' and `East' by the `iron curtain'. Your studies will look at the communist monopoly of power and Soviet control over Eastern Europe, and the numerous challenges, upheavals and compromises it underwent between 1945 and 1989. In addition to high-profile popular challenges to the ruling authorities such as the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and the Prague Spring of 1968, this module will also see you consider the various reforms adopted, the increasing role of dissent, and some of the ways that people reacted to, reshaped and resisted communism in their everyday lives.

Consider the development of the criminal justice system during the 18th and 19th centuries. In particular you will explore the role that transportation to North America and Australia played in convicts' lives in that period. You will use the Old Bailey and Digital Panopticon online digital sources to explore convict lives across time and space.

Explore the origins of modern environmentalism, examining the development of ideas and beliefs about nature and its conservation on a worldwide scale over the past two centuries. You will study key themes and approaches in the relatively new field of environmental history. Major analytical issues that you will explore include cultural attitudes to nature, changing technologies, the environmental impacts of colonial expansion, increasing industrialization and urbanization, and political and legislative responses to environmental problems.

Examine the history of Italy from the beginning of the country's national resurgence during the late 18th century to the present day. You will study the major political, economic, social and cultural developments of this history with a particular focus upon the themes of `continuity' and `change' from one period to another.

Gain hands-on experience of making public history by working in a small group on a discrete local history project commissioned by an external group or member of academic staff. Training workshops and tutorials will help guide you through the research process and the final outcome will be determined by each group in consultation with their sponsor. This module will reflect a growing interest in local communities about the places where they live, and will provide you with the opportunity to critically reflect on the skills you have developed and the public role of the historian.

Consider the social, political and cultural histories of Paris in the 19th century. Starting with Napoleon's demise in 1815, you will trace the rise and fall of the many political dynasties and systems which came and went in this period. You will then move on to looking at social and cultural change, as well as the developments in urban planning and infrastructure, all of which caused many to consider Paris the `Capital of the 19th Century.'

Study the role that the street has played since the mid-19th century in shaping our lives and identities. This module is concerned with the everyday lives of urban dwellers who used streets for work, leisure, travel, and living in its many legal and illegal ways. You will examine the different users of the street, and the changing representation of the street across our period. In addition to lectures and seminars, you will attend classes off-campus - on the streets and in the arcades with walking tours, in the city's public libraries and in museums. You will be introduced to the variety of primary sources that reveal the personality of a city's streets and activities, around which you will write assignments: photographs, film, maps, newspapers, testimonies, and the buildings and public spaces themselves.

This module will examine the ways in which different kinds of public history - historic buildings and gardens, museums, writers' homes, industrial archaeology - reflect the diverse pasts of people in Britain. You will be equipped with the skills to analyse the processes which help and hinder historical changes, the commercial and policy pressures faced by heritage bodies, and changing legislation such as the 2010 Equalities Act. You will also develop skills in analysing these debates in order to apply your knowledge to particular sites and the interpretations of social history that they offer.

Leeds Beckett University
Dr Helen Dampier
Senior Lecturer
Helen's teaching reflects her interest in life writings of all kinds and the ways in which such writings are used as historical sources. Her research includes a strong focus on the history of South Africa, including the political aftermaths of the 1899-1902 South African War and the role of women in the development of Afrikaner nationalism in South Africa. A member of the UK Women’s History Network, Helen has presented her research at national and international conferences, and has written and joint-authored a number of publications.
Our teaching provides you with a stimulating course that draws on the best of English and History, and will encourage your innovative thinking.
Play BA (Hons) English and History - Dr Helen Dampier, Senior Lecturer Video
BA (Hons) English and History - Dr Helen Dampier, Senior Lecturer
Play Being Human Festival Video
Being Human Festival
Play Being Human Festival City Maps Video
Being Human Festival City Maps
Play Being Human Festival City Tour Video
Being Human Festival City Tour

Fees & funding

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.
See further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our Bursaries and Scholarships.

Educational visits - The cost for these trips covers travel, accommodation and subsistence. The price varies year by year and attendance is optional.

Study materials - We provide core materials during your studies and you may choose to purchase additional materials. This is not compulsory and will depend upon the projects you undertake.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.

The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.
See further information on fees and finance on our Financing Your Studies webpage.

Educational visits - The cost for these trips covers travel, accommodation and subsistence. The price varies year by year and attendance is optional.

Study materials - We provide core materials during your studies and you may choose to purchase additional materials. This is not compulsory and will depend upon the projects you undertake.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.

The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Learning spaces

  • Broadcasting Place
    Broadcasting Place

    Officially one of the world’s best tall buildings and a big talking point in Leeds, Broadcasting Place is home to our cultural studies and humanities courses. It offers a space for students to join an academic community that plays an active role in shaping contemporary debates about the future direction of those disciplines.

  • Online resources and collections
    Online resources and collections

    Whether you want to analyse accounts of 17th-century criminal proceedings from the Old Bailey, sift through more than 355,000 works of English and American poetry, prose and drama or explore the world's largest archive of 20th-century popular culture, our Library's online resources provide easy access to a range of diverse collections.

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

Location

Broadcasting Place, City Campus

Broadcasting Place, City Campus

Broadcasting place is officially one of the world's best tall buildings (voted the world's 'Best Tall Building' in 2010 by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat) and is a big talking point in Leeds. Home to our arts, design, architecture and built environment courses, it provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

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Want to know more?

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We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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