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English Literature
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

English Literature

International Scholarships available

Overview

From Shakespeare's stage to the digital page. Explore the world of literature through the study of poems, plays and prose in their historical and cultural contexts.

Embrace a wide range of theoretical approaches and work directly with leading literary researchers to develop your own creative and critical voice.

Graduate with transferable skills in writing, research and critical thinking which are highly valued by employers.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.



Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

We celebrate students and staff with a true passion for the Arts and Humanities.

Through inspired teaching and intellectual debate, plus day to day interaction with award-winning authors and playwrights, a rolling programme of media industry professionals, published lecturers and world-renowned researchers, we will nurture your passion by developing your creative and critical thinking.

Then we will open your mind to the wide range of opportunities to pursue a career you love, be it anything from writing and teaching, through journalism and copywriting, business and marketing, to research and publishing.

Leeds is the Northern heart of culture and the arts. Your campus sits in the very centre of the city,surrounded by over 18 museums, 10 art galleries, 17 theatres, 4 film production companies and 3 recording studios (plus the odd bar, restaurant and club!). We work directly with Leeds museums and galleries and many regional events, including the Ilkley Literature Festival and the Leeds West Indian Carnival.

Our research and teaching explore a diversity of topics, from South Africa under Apartheid to the cultural impact of the LGBTQ community and from on-line racism in football to 21st century genres. We're also very hands-on: from regular conferences, seminars and events organised by our Centre for Culture and the Arts, to collaborations with institutes and cultural organisations.

There are also opportunities to take part in Erasmus exchanges with universities in Spain, Hungary, France, Ireland and the Czech Republic. Take a look at the opportunities we provide to study abroad.

A collaboration with multinational services network PwC granted our history and English students exclusive access to the company’s archives to compile a unique collection of letters sent during WWI.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Course Features

  • Study abroad option
  • Part-time study available
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
Play Cultural Studies & Humanities School video 2018 Video
Cultural Studies & Humanities School video 2018
Play BA (Hons) English Literature - Robert Burroughs, Senior Lecturer Video
BA (Hons) English Literature - Robert Burroughs, Senior Lecturer
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Being Human Festival
Play Being Human Festival City Maps Video
Being Human Festival City Maps
Play Being Human Festival City Tour Video
Being Human Festival City Tour

Entry Requirements

112
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum Grades BB in two A Levels, or equivalent, excluding General Studies, must include English Language or Literature).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

Additional Requirements

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website.

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points:112 points required. (Minimum Grades BB in two A Levels, or equivalent, excluding General Studies, must include English Language or Literature).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

Additional Requirements

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.


More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Seeta Wrightson

Careers

Seeta Wrightson
Senior Editor UK Greetings

BA (Hons) English Literature

“English has always been my passion, so doing a degree where I could read and analyse texts was perfect. My course had a creative writing aspect which I loved, and is something that really helps in my work today. The verses I write are seen by thousands of people across the UK, which makes me really proud.

Teaching and learning

Learn to identify, evaluate and analyse a range of texts. You will be able to produce sophisticated interpretations of texts and write across a range of genres, forms and styles for a diverse range of audiences. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study – the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
You will develop your knowledge of literary periods and movements in relation to theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches within the field. Over six core modules you will develop your critical and analytical skills through close readings, critical analysis and interpretations.
Overall workload
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270 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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986 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
20%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
5%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
75%
Core Modules

Study comic drama produced in the period from the Renaissance to the Restoration. This module will provide a framework through which these texts can be interpreted and understood in relation to the historical moments in which they were produced. You will explore the relationship between the comedies and aspects of elite and popular cultures, and you will consider the relationship of these plays to the practices of carnival, festive and masquerade in early modern England.

Study a range of fiction from the `long eighteenth century' (approximately 1680-1810). Your studies will enable you to place these fictions within their wider cultural and political contexts.

This module will support you as you start to work at degree level and develop strategies for the interpretation of contemporary literary texts. You will engage with a range of post-millennial texts that seek to problematize the contemporary period. You teaching will focus on literary innovations and ways in which texts interact with techniques, approaches and debates in literary studies today. Your learning will explore a range of critical approaches through a number of set texts to help you develop key skills that will inform your work at degree level.

Develops your critical-thinking skills and your ability to interpret literary texts. You will explore major theoretical approaches to the study of literature using extracts from theorists' work and supporting resources.

You will be introduced to the study of narrative by examining a series of short narratives from a given period in literary history.

Study a wide variety of poetry written in English and gain an understanding of the development of poetry from the Shakespearean period through to contemporary times. You will be better acquainted with a range of poetry in order to develop your sense of literary history. You will study critical and theoretical perspectives and interpretive tools to enable you to approach the reading and analysis of poetry with confidence.

You will study four core and two option modules. Your studies will focus on developing your knowledge of historical contexts and of English as a global literature. The scope of your studies will widen and you will complete a range of longer essays, presentations and seminar discussions.
Overall workload
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280 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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977 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
5%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
95%
Core Modules

Explore the emergence and development of the Romantic movement in Britain between 1780 and 1830 through engaging with a range of literature across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. You will analyse Romanticism using theoretical and critical methods.

Develop critical and interpretative skills informed by an understanding of the role theory plays in literary studies. This module will enable you to become more confident and more adventurous in your study of literature.

Explore the ways in which American writers have pursued liberty, equality, and self-expression in a nation divided by both race and class.

Option modules may include:

Gain an understanding of `postcolonial' literature and the conceptual and critical vocabulary you will need to read and analyse texts from formerly colonised regions of the world.

Explore issues of context - what it is, where it comes from and what its relation is to other forms of information. You will develop strong research skills by taking a theoretically informed approach to contextual study of literature.

Study a selection of literature of the 20th century and examine how literature writes about some of the key events of the for example as WWI, WWII, post-war austerity and the Cold War. You will understand key terms such as modernism and postmodernism. You will consider texts that focus on the idea of alienation and dystopia and the place of the individual in society and explore why writers of the period turned to imagining the future in order to express their concerns with their present moments. In preparation for writing your dissertation, you will be guided through the process of developing your own research question to become a more independent learner.

Understand the way that humanities disciplines and skills intersect with a range of professional working contexts. You will complete 36 hours of live-brief learning to gain first-hand experience of planning, delivery and evaluating a professional working brief set by an industry partner organisation. You will work as a group across 10 weeks alongside a tutor to design, deliver, present and evaluate the brief to industry standards. As well as conducting a reflective case study of your brief, you will complete a CV, cover letter, LinkedIn profile and undertake a recorded mock interview.

This module provides an intensive introduction to creative writing at university level. You will be exposed to a number of different forms, styles, and techniques of literary/artistic writing as you work towards producing a substantial portfolio of original writing.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Your third year will see you focus on specialised topics through your choice of option modules and your year-long dissertation. You will develop your ability to think and research independently, construct sophisticated textual arguments and critical interpretations.
Overall workload
Clock icon
158 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
1098 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
33%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
8%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
59%
Core Modules

You will demonstrate a full range of skills, knowledge, and competencies developed over three years of study. This module provides an opportunity for you to choose and explore a field of study that has particularly engaged your interest.

Option modules may include:

Explore the development of the Gothic from its literary origins in the mid-18th century through to the mid-20th century. You will analyse the literary and cultural properties of Gothicism as it has shifted and diversified over this period and you will be encouraged to engage with Gothic novels alongside a range of forms across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. This module will also introduce you to theoretical and critical methods of analysing the Gothic such as Freud's concept of the uncanny and Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection.

Examine the development of 20th-century fiction by women with particular reference to the genre of romantic fiction. You will explore how a number of writers have modified and transformed the conventions of romantic fiction and discuss the appeal of romantic fiction in terms of its specific historical contexts and in relation to psychoanalytic models of desire and narrative. This module will provide the opportunity to study these texts alongside some key feminist theories of gender and sexuality of the 20th century. You will be encouraged to develop advanced analytic skills, coupled with critical self-reflexivity in the understanding and application of theory. The group oral presentation of ideas and argument will build on your existing communication and collaboration skills.

Study a selection of American plays from the 1920s to the 1990s, focusing on the ways in which they dramatise the relationship between public issues and private concerns. This module investigate the ways in which American drama stages the enduring conflict between the search for individual happiness and the making of social and political bonds in a society based on an ideology of competitive individualism. The module will provide opportunities to refine your skills in collaborative work, oral presentation, guided research, and independent study.

Engage with debates about masculinity which took place during the long 18th century. You will read a range of literary texts, including novels and poetry and focus on important models of 'manliness' which were prevalent in the period. This module will encourage you to situate texts in relation to historical context, and also to engage with theory.

Examine the relationships between writing and the Northern Ireland conflict (1966-1998). You will consider the ways in which writing responds to serious and prolonged political and social crisis and how it offers insights into issues normally considered to be purely within the realm of party or national politics. This module will enable you to understand the way literature negotiates the tensions between the demands of artistic integrity and independence and the pressures to speak out or to contribute towards the resolution of violent political division. You will also look at texts produced after 1998, a time of somewhat uncertain `peace and reconciliation'.

Understand how writers and film-makers have imagined city spaces and identities in a range of postcolonial locations. Through an exciting range of literary and cinematic texts, and drawing on theories of urban space, place, and postcoloniality, you will explore issues that are of central importance to the world many of us live in today, including migrant labour, asylum seekers, refugees, and illegal immigrants; crime, conflict, and policing; memory, history, and urban space; class, gender, race, sexuality, and the postcolonial city amongst others.

Gain an understanding of the cultural connections between Africa and the African Diaspora through the analysis of a range of key literary works. Through close reading and analysis of the modules primary texts and the interrogation of postcolonial theoretical debates, you will be encouraged to explore the intersections and tensions between issues of race, gender, identity, education and language within the contexts of slavery, colonialism, migration and exile.

Explore contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovativeness, contemporaneity and their interaction with socio-cultural developments of the new millennium. You will engage with cutting edge texts to consider their innovations in and interactions with the contemporary world.

Understand the key concepts and debates in disability studies and how these can be applied to literary texts. This module will emphasise the centrality of literary studies to the emergent, interdisciplinary area of medical humanities.

Study travel writing focusing on the long 20th century. You will discuss three key ingredients of the genre: the travelling self, the journey and the destination. This module will examine a range of texts to explore issues such as the possibility of defining travel writing as a coherent genre and the key formal, thematic and material properties. You will also look at how social identity affects the way we travel and write about travel, and travel writing an excavation of the self, of the place visited, or both.

Examine a body of reading, thought, and practice in contemporary writing loosely understood as `avant-garde' or experimental writing. Given the renegade nature of these works, we will move away from using such generic categories as poetry or prose, even as we try to understand how these texts usefully extend and interrogate precisely those categories. Through a programme of close reading, in-class and online discussion, and independent study, you will critically and creatively engage with a rich tradition of contemporary literary practice.

Much of what the Victorians had regarded as natural, stable, and morally dependable about their society seemed to be under threat during the 19th century. Factors such as the arrival of the new woman and the decadent man, scandals of sexual predation in the London underworld, the criminalisation of male homosexuality, the anxious recognition of violence in the colonies and scientific theories of eugenics all placed a new and often unwanted spotlight on Victorian notions of gendered and sexual roles and behaviours, racial fitness and the right to imperial rule, and the moralising purpose of the arts. You will examine how writers articulated and responded to these concerns in the forging of identifiably 'fin-de-siecle' aesthetics and mentalities.

This module explores Renaissance tragedy with a particularly the sub-genre of revenge tragedy. You will explore canonical works such as Hamlet but also less familiar examples of the genre such as The Revenger's Tragedy. You will understand and analyse the plays in relation to the culture in which they were produced and the ideological tensions which traverse them.

Examine the development of 20th-century fiction by women with particular reference to the genre of romantic fiction. You will explore how a number of writers have modified and transformed the conventions of romantic fiction and discuss the appeal of romantic fiction in terms of its specific historical contexts and in relation to psychoanalytic models of desire and narrative. This module will provide the opportunity to study these texts alongside some key feminist theories of gender and sexuality of the 20th century. You will be encouraged to develop advanced analytic skills, coupled with critical self-reflexivity in the understanding and application of theory. The group oral presentation of ideas and argument will build on your existing communication and collaboration skills.

Study the autobiographical branch of creative non-fiction.You will complete a number of creative writing exercises and regular workshops to help you refine your work with feedback from fellow students and tutor feedback in class, online, verbally, and in writing. This module will see you read a range of exemplary works of autobiographical non-fiction with a critical eye to begin making connections between the techniques and approaches of published works and your own.

Leeds Beckett University
Dr Robert Burroughs
Head of Subject
Robert specialises in Victorian narratives of imperialism, the slave trade and its abolition. His PhD, which explores travellers' eyewitness reports of atrocities committed by colonialists in the Congo, Angola, and the Putumayo, was published in revised form by Routledge in 2010. Robert is currently researching the representation of sailors and maritime space in literary, legal and political texts of the nineteenth century.
You'll study ghost stories and science fiction, as well as the more traditional literary genres, and examine how "the classics" are shaped by popular culture. We explore English as a world literature, studying works from the USA, the Caribbean and Africa.
Play Cultural Studies & Humanities School video 2018 Video
Cultural Studies & Humanities School video 2018
Play BA (Hons) English Literature - Robert Burroughs, Senior Lecturer Video
BA (Hons) English Literature - Robert Burroughs, Senior Lecturer
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Being Human Festival
Play Being Human Festival City Maps Video
Being Human Festival City Maps
Play Being Human Festival City Tour Video
Being Human Festival City Tour

Fees & funding

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.
See further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our Bursaries and Scholarships.

Educational visits - The cost for these trips covers travel, accommodation and subsistence. The price varies year by year and attendance is optional.

Study materials - We provide core materials during your studies and you may choose to purchase additional materials. This is not compulsory and will depend upon the projects you undertake.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.
See further information on fees and finance on our Financing Your Studies webpage.

Educational visits - The cost for these trips covers travel, accommodation and subsistence. The price varies year by year and attendance is optional.

Study materials - We provide core materials during your studies and you may choose to purchase additional materials. This is not compulsory and will depend upon the projects you undertake.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Learning spaces

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Broadcasting Place
    Broadcasting Place

    Officially one of the world’s best tall buildings and a big talking point in Leeds, Broadcasting Place is home to our cultural studies and humanities courses. It offers a space for students to join an academic community that plays an active role in shaping contemporary debates about the future direction of those disciplines.

  • Online resources and collections
    Online resources and collections

    Whether you want to analyse accounts of 17th-century criminal proceedings from the Old Bailey, sift through more than 355,000 works of English and American poetry, prose and drama or explore the world's largest archive of 20th-century popular culture, our Library's online resources provide easy access to a range of diverse collections.

Location

Broadcasting Place, City Campus

Broadcasting Place, City Campus

Broadcasting place is officially one of the world's best tall buildings (voted the world's 'Best Tall Building' in 2010 by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat) and is a big talking point in Leeds. Home to our arts, design, architecture and built environment courses, it provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

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Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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