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BAHOS
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

Housing Studies

Housing Studies

Housing Studies

Housing Studies

Housing Studies

Housing Studies

International Scholarships available

Overview

Learn how you could help shape our world into a better place on this reflective course designed for modern housing professionals, or those aspiring to work in the sector.

This course will have a strong strand of professional development embedded throughout your modules and will develop your skills and knowledge, so you can understand contemporary and relevant critiques of the current housing sector.

Your studies will address both academic and practical perspectives, covering topics such as the ways different groups co-exist in urban areas, how to use legal frameworks, leadership, professional ethics and tenants’ law. In your final year, you will be able to tailor your studies to meet your professional aspirations.   

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH). You will have the opportunity to examine the latest housing policy, take part in debates with local professionals and expand work-related research skills by contributing to research seminars or helping out in partnership meetings with housing employers. You will be taught by practising housing studies professionals, whose wide-ranging work will inform your learning.

There are field trips abroad visiting places such as France, Germany and Lithuania – giving you the chance to experience different urban and cultural environments. You will work alongside students from other universities on joint fieldwork projects. You will also have the chance to study abroad for one semester – usually in your second year – and you can choose from a wide selection of universities. Popular choices include Macquaire University in Sydney, Australia and the University of San Diego in America.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

Course Features

  • 24/7 Library
  • Expert careers service
  • Part-time study available
  • Placements
  • Real-life projects
  • Study abroad option
  • TEF Silver Award
  • University accommodation

Entry Requirements

112
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSE.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu. If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website. Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy are accepted in place of GCSE.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Leeds Beckett University Careers

Careers

Teaching and learning

We regularly review our courses to ensure we are offering you the best educational experience. This course is currently being reviewed for 2019 entry, therefore the information below is correct for students joining us in 2018/19 but there may be changes for students who wish to join us in 2019/20. These will be confirmed in the course specification made available to new applicants on this page from February 2019.

Examine the latest housing policy, take part in debates with local professionals and expand work-related research skills by contributing to research seminars, helping out in partnership meetings with housing employers or taking part in an international field trip.

Download 2019/20 Course Spec Download
You will be introduced to the breadth of your subject and the inter-disciplinary nature of a housing degree. Each module will explore the various ways in which the theory and practical application of housing meets key themes of sustainability, leadership, professionalism and the broader social and economic context.
Core Modules

Analyse your existing abilities, skills and knowledge by reflecting on your career to date, your aspirations and the relationship of study to work. You will have the opportunity to develop your learning and research skills, including referencing, writing, reading and note-taking.

Examine the impact of global, national and local urban policies on the development of cities and how they are shaped both physically and environmentally.

Examine the origins and contemporary organisation of welfare policy. You will look at what government is trying to achieve through its policies, why it wants to achieve those aims and what the effects are on both tenants and housing organisations.

Further develop your own reflective learning and make connections with learning and the roles of professionals in the workplace.

Learn to understand and develop notions and concepts relating to leadership in professional housing practice. You will link concepts of leadership and management to real world practice and benchmark against Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) ethics in the housing profession.

This module introduces you to the essential legal aspects used by professionals in the built environment and is used as a foundation for modules in the following years.

Critique and reflect upon your knowledge developed in the classroom and explore real world examples identified by the needs of employers or industry in general.
Core Modules

Explore the urban and semi-natural environment of a neighbourhood and develop your ability to communicate your designs effectively.

Evaluate strategies for housing delivery and gain an understanding of the complex relationship between housing markets, economic policy and human wellbeing.

Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.

Enhance your professional skills on a ten-week work placement. Working with a local employer, you will develop your graduate attributes and reflect on the transferable skills you will need for your chosen career.

Option modules may include:

The Hong Kong housing market is dominated by the interrelationship between government decision making and public policy and the private market are complex and pivotal. You will learn to understand how decisions affect day-to-day lives and the housing profession through projects notionally coined as urban regeneration or revitalisation.

Gain a holistic understanding of the crucial processes, mechanisms and regulatory frameworks utilised in the provision of a safe environment from the perspective of fire and its associated hazards.

Building on the knowledge you have gained during the Sustainable Places and City & Society modules, you will explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.

Develop your ability to formulate policy or strategic solutions to problems associated with housing need. This includes the social problems associated with access to housing, and the implementation and assessment of strategies and policy initiatives within housing organisations, assessments of housing need, homelessness, supported housing and lettings.

Explore the concepts of justice and equality, both locally and globally, by examining the structures, processes and policies that generate and sustain patterns of spatial segregation and social exclusion at various scales, including city, neighbourhood and community.

You will begin to think independently about the direction of your own career and study pathway and you will apply the knowledge and skills gained over the past three years to a range of specialist options.
Core Modules

Analyse the notion of professionalism within the housing discipline. This module provides an opportunity to reflect upon ethics, equal opportunities and the CIH Code of Conduct in a real-world setting.

Study key issues in housing delivery, delving behind public and private market interventions to examine the way housing problems are constructed and addressed.

Make use of the research methods and techniques you have learned and the skills you have gained during your course to carry out a sustained piece of research and to write this up in the form of a clearly argued and coherently structured dissertation.

Option modules may include:

Discover the multiple and frequently contested ways of understanding, representing and communicating social space and place. You will examine a number of key issues through the concept of the geographical imagination.

This module provide an introduction to the theories, issues and practice relevant to one of the most pressing issues facing social housing today - that of providing services to diverse communities.

Facilities management is a supporting management function to the core business of an organisation. This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the concepts of core and non-core activities and the interface of physical workplace and people.

Gain an understanding of the distinctive and dynamic nature of urban and metropolitan development in the East Asia/Pacific Asia region. You will examine the relative influences of forces of globalisation and local cultural and other factors shaping the built environment of the region’s major urban areas.

Download 2019/20 Course Spec Download
You will be introduced to the breadth of your subject and the inter-disciplinary nature of a housing degree. Each module will explore the various ways in which the theory and practical application of housing meets key themes of sustainability, leadership, professionalism and the broader social and economic context.
Core Modules

Analyse your existing abilities, skills and knowledge by reflecting on your career to date, your aspirations and the relationship of study to work. You will have the opportunity to develop your learning and research skills, including referencing, writing, reading and note-taking.

Examine the impact of global, national and local urban policies on the development of cities and how they are shaped both physically and environmentally.

Examine the origins and contemporary organisation of welfare policy. You will look at what government is trying to achieve through its policies, why it wants to achieve those aims and what the effects are on both tenants and housing organisations.

Further develop your own reflective learning and make connections with learning and the roles of professionals in the workplace.

Learn to understand and develop notions and concepts relating to leadership in professional housing practice. You will link concepts of leadership and management to real world practice and benchmark against Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) ethics in the housing profession.

This module introduces you to the essential legal aspects used by professionals in the built environment and is used as a foundation for modules in the following years.

Critique and reflect upon your knowledge developed in the classroom and explore real world examples identified by the needs of employers or industry in general.
Core Modules

Explore the urban and semi-natural environment of a neighbourhood and develop your ability to communicate your designs effectively.

Evaluate strategies for housing delivery and gain an understanding of the complex relationship between housing markets, economic policy and human wellbeing.

Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.

Enhance your professional skills on a ten-week work placement. Working with a local employer, you will develop your graduate attributes and reflect on the transferable skills you will need for your chosen career.

Option modules may include:

The Hong Kong housing market is dominated by the interrelationship between government decision making and public policy and the private market are complex and pivotal. You will learn to understand how decisions affect day-to-day lives and the housing profession through projects notionally coined as urban regeneration or revitalisation.

Gain a holistic understanding of the crucial processes, mechanisms and regulatory frameworks utilised in the provision of a safe environment from the perspective of fire and its associated hazards.

Building on the knowledge you have gained during the Sustainable Places and City & Society modules, you will explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.

Develop your ability to formulate policy or strategic solutions to problems associated with housing need. This includes the social problems associated with access to housing, and the implementation and assessment of strategies and policy initiatives within housing organisations, assessments of housing need, homelessness, supported housing and lettings.

Explore the concepts of justice and equality, both locally and globally, by examining the structures, processes and policies that generate and sustain patterns of spatial segregation and social exclusion at various scales, including city, neighbourhood and community.

You will begin to think independently about the direction of your own career and study pathway and you will apply the knowledge and skills gained over the past three years to a range of specialist options.
Core Modules

Analyse the notion of professionalism within the housing discipline. This module provides an opportunity to reflect upon ethics, equal opportunities and the CIH Code of Conduct in a real-world setting.

Study key issues in housing delivery, delving behind public and private market interventions to examine the way housing problems are constructed and addressed.

Make use of the research methods and techniques you have learned and the skills you have gained during your course to carry out a sustained piece of research and to write this up in the form of a clearly argued and coherently structured dissertation.

Option modules may include:

Discover the multiple and frequently contested ways of understanding, representing and communicating social space and place. You will examine a number of key issues through the concept of the geographical imagination.

This module provide an introduction to the theories, issues and practice relevant to one of the most pressing issues facing social housing today - that of providing services to diverse communities.

Facilities management is a supporting management function to the core business of an organisation. This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the concepts of core and non-core activities and the interface of physical workplace and people.

Gain an understanding of the distinctive and dynamic nature of urban and metropolitan development in the East Asia/Pacific Asia region. You will examine the relative influences of forces of globalisation and local cultural and other factors shaping the built environment of the region’s major urban areas.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
You will be introduced to the breadth of your subject and the inter-disciplinary nature of a housing degree. Each module will explore the various ways in which the theory and practical application of housing meets key themes of sustainability, leadership, professionalism and the broader social and economic context.
Core Modules

Analyse your existing abilities, skills and knowledge by reflecting on your career to date, your aspirations and the relationship of study to work. You will have the opportunity to develop your learning and research skills, including referencing, writing, reading and note-taking.

Examine the impact of global, national and local urban policies on the development of cities and how they are shaped both physically and environmentally.

Examine the origins and contemporary organisation of welfare policy. You will look at what government is trying to achieve through its policies, why it wants to achieve those aims and what the effects are on both tenants and housing organisations.

Further develop your own reflective learning and make connections with learning and the roles of professionals in the workplace.

Learn to understand and develop notions and concepts relating to leadership in professional housing practice. You will link concepts of leadership and management to real world practice and benchmark against Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) ethics in the housing profession.

This module introduces you to the essential legal aspects used by professionals in the built environment and is used as a foundation for modules in the following years.

Critique and reflect upon your knowledge developed in the classroom and explore real world examples identified by the needs of employers or industry in general.
Core Modules

Explore the urban and semi-natural environment of a neighbourhood and develop your ability to communicate your designs effectively.

Evaluate strategies for housing delivery and gain an understanding of the complex relationship between housing markets, economic policy and human wellbeing.

Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.

Enhance your professional skills on a ten-week work placement. Working with a local employer, you will develop your graduate attributes and reflect on the transferable skills you will need for your chosen career.

Option modules may include:

The Hong Kong housing market is dominated by the interrelationship between government decision making and public policy and the private market are complex and pivotal. You will learn to understand how decisions affect day-to-day lives and the housing profession through projects notionally coined as urban regeneration or revitalisation.

Gain a holistic understanding of the crucial processes, mechanisms and regulatory frameworks utilised in the provision of a safe environment from the perspective of fire and its associated hazards.

Building on the knowledge you have gained during the Sustainable Places and City & Society modules, you will explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.

Develop your ability to formulate policy or strategic solutions to problems associated with housing need. This includes the social problems associated with access to housing, and the implementation and assessment of strategies and policy initiatives within housing organisations, assessments of housing need, homelessness, supported housing and lettings.

Explore the concepts of justice and equality, both locally and globally, by examining the structures, processes and policies that generate and sustain patterns of spatial segregation and social exclusion at various scales, including city, neighbourhood and community.

You will begin to think independently about the direction of your own career and study pathway and you will apply the knowledge and skills gained over the past three years to a range of specialist options.
Core Modules

Analyse the notion of professionalism within the housing discipline. This module provides an opportunity to reflect upon ethics, equal opportunities and the CIH Code of Conduct in a real-world setting.

Study key issues in housing delivery, delving behind public and private market interventions to examine the way housing problems are constructed and addressed.

Make use of the research methods and techniques you have learned and the skills you have gained during your course to carry out a sustained piece of research and to write this up in the form of a clearly argued and coherently structured dissertation.

Option modules may include:

Discover the multiple and frequently contested ways of understanding, representing and communicating social space and place. You will examine a number of key issues through the concept of the geographical imagination.

This module provide an introduction to the theories, issues and practice relevant to one of the most pressing issues facing social housing today - that of providing services to diverse communities.

Facilities management is a supporting management function to the core business of an organisation. This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the concepts of core and non-core activities and the interface of physical workplace and people.

Gain an understanding of the distinctive and dynamic nature of urban and metropolitan development in the East Asia/Pacific Asia region. You will examine the relative influences of forces of globalisation and local cultural and other factors shaping the built environment of the region’s major urban areas.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
You will be introduced to the breadth of your subject and the inter-disciplinary nature of a housing degree. Each module will explore the various ways in which the theory and practical application of housing meets key themes of sustainability, leadership, professionalism and the broader social and economic context.
Core Modules

Analyse your existing abilities, skills and knowledge by reflecting on your career to date, your aspirations and the relationship of study to work. You will have the opportunity to develop your learning and research skills, including referencing, writing, reading and note-taking.

Examine the impact of global, national and local urban policies on the development of cities and how they are shaped both physically and environmentally.

Examine the origins and contemporary organisation of welfare policy. You will look at what government is trying to achieve through its policies, why it wants to achieve those aims and what the effects are on both tenants and housing organisations.

Further develop your own reflective learning and make connections with learning and the roles of professionals in the workplace.

Learn to understand and develop notions and concepts relating to leadership in professional housing practice. You will link concepts of leadership and management to real world practice and benchmark against Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) ethics in the housing profession.

This module introduces you to the essential legal aspects used by professionals in the built environment and is used as a foundation for modules in the following years.

Critique and reflect upon your knowledge developed in the classroom and explore real world examples identified by the needs of employers or industry in general.
Core Modules

Explore the urban and semi-natural environment of a neighbourhood and develop your ability to communicate your designs effectively.

Evaluate strategies for housing delivery and gain an understanding of the complex relationship between housing markets, economic policy and human wellbeing.

Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.

Enhance your professional skills on a ten-week work placement. Working with a local employer, you will develop your graduate attributes and reflect on the transferable skills you will need for your chosen career.

Option modules may include:

The Hong Kong housing market is dominated by the interrelationship between government decision making and public policy and the private market are complex and pivotal. You will learn to understand how decisions affect day-to-day lives and the housing profession through projects notionally coined as urban regeneration or revitalisation.

Gain a holistic understanding of the crucial processes, mechanisms and regulatory frameworks utilised in the provision of a safe environment from the perspective of fire and its associated hazards.

Building on the knowledge you have gained during the Sustainable Places and City & Society modules, you will explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.

Develop your ability to formulate policy or strategic solutions to problems associated with housing need. This includes the social problems associated with access to housing, and the implementation and assessment of strategies and policy initiatives within housing organisations, assessments of housing need, homelessness, supported housing and lettings.

Explore the concepts of justice and equality, both locally and globally, by examining the structures, processes and policies that generate and sustain patterns of spatial segregation and social exclusion at various scales, including city, neighbourhood and community.

You will begin to think independently about the direction of your own career and study pathway and you will apply the knowledge and skills gained over the past three years to a range of specialist options.
Core Modules

Analyse the notion of professionalism within the housing discipline. This module provides an opportunity to reflect upon ethics, equal opportunities and the CIH Code of Conduct in a real-world setting.

Study key issues in housing delivery, delving behind public and private market interventions to examine the way housing problems are constructed and addressed.

Make use of the research methods and techniques you have learned and the skills you have gained during your course to carry out a sustained piece of research and to write this up in the form of a clearly argued and coherently structured dissertation.

Option modules may include:

Discover the multiple and frequently contested ways of understanding, representing and communicating social space and place. You will examine a number of key issues through the concept of the geographical imagination.

This module provide an introduction to the theories, issues and practice relevant to one of the most pressing issues facing social housing today - that of providing services to diverse communities.

Facilities management is a supporting management function to the core business of an organisation. This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the concepts of core and non-core activities and the interface of physical workplace and people.

Gain an understanding of the distinctive and dynamic nature of urban and metropolitan development in the East Asia/Pacific Asia region. You will examine the relative influences of forces of globalisation and local cultural and other factors shaping the built environment of the region’s major urban areas.

Quintin Bradley
Dr Quintin Bradley
Senior Lecturer

Dr Quintin Bradley is a Senior Lecturer in Planning and Housing and leads research into community planning and its impact on housing supply. His work is published in peer reviewed international journals and he is the author of books on the tenants' movement and on localism and neighbourhood planning.

Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Optional overseas field trips are subsidised – the university will cover approximately 60% of the cost of the trip. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module. You will need to pay around 35% of the total cost of the trip. The remaining 65% of the cost is met by the university)

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Optional overseas field trips are subsidised – the university will cover approximately 60% of the cost of the trip. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module. You will need to pay around 35% of the total cost of the trip. The remaining 65% of the cost is met by the university)

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Studying part-time gives you the flexibility to learn at your own pace. Because of this, our tuition fees are calculated using credit points. Each module you study has a credit point value. Most modules have a credit point value of 20. The tuition fee for students entering in in 201920 on this course is £1541.60 for each 20 credit point module. For modules with a different credit point value their cost can be calculated by multiplying the credit value of the module by the cost per credit point of £77.08. The amount you will pay may increase each year in line with inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Optional overseas field trips are subsidised – the university will cover approximately 60% of the cost of the trip. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module. You will need to pay around 35% of the total cost of the trip. The remaining 65% of the cost is met by the university)

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Studying part-time gives you the flexibility to learn at your own pace. Because of this, our tuition fees are calculated using credit points. Each module you study has a credit point value. Most modules have a credit point value of 20. The tuition fee for students entering in in 201920 on this course is £2000 for each 20 credit point module. For modules with a different credit point value their cost can be calculated by multiplying the credit value of the module by the cost per credit point of £100. The amount you will pay may increase each year in line with inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Optional overseas field trips are subsidised – the university will cover approximately 60% of the cost of the trip. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module. You will need to pay around 35% of the total cost of the trip. The remaining 65% of the cost is met by the university)

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee rates for undergraduate applicants, commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time by the UK Government. We expect these fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.
The tuition fees for this course, for applicants commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time. These fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.
The tuition fee rates for undergraduate applicants, commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time by the UK Government. We expect these fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.
The tuition fees for this course, for applicants commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time. These fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

View in Google Maps

Want to know more?

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We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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