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Student in Broadcasting Place
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

Human Geography and History

Human Geography and History

Human Geography and History

International Scholarships available

Overview

History and human geography have never been more closely linked. Geographers have started to consider the long-term trends that have shaped the world around us and, at the same time, environmental and urban history have recently emerged as vibrant areas.

Your course will give you the opportunity to explore the connections and conflicts between these fields. You will study cultural, social, political and environmental developments locally, nationally and globally, and you will discover how these changes have formed the environments, landscapes and societies we live in today.

Guided by our expert teaching staff, you will examine the history of relocation and migration, explore the ideas of place, power and identity, and consider the ethical concerns of diverse societies and vibrant cities. You will be able to select option modules that cover both subjects, and your dissertation will allow you to embrace an area of particular interest to you.

Follow us on our Twitter account @PlanningHGeog

Studying a joint honours course will challenge your ways of thinking and doing, as you develop skills and expertise in two different but closely related disciplines. You will study alongside students from our BA (Hons) History and BA (Hons) Human Geography courses, giving you the opportunity to meet new people and share ideas.

Our staff work across the boundaries of these subjects, so they will guide you as you explore the points of difference between the two and help you discover how human geography and history feed into each other. Their wide-ranging research work will inform your learning - you will be taught by specialists in environmental history, Victorian street life, travel writing and the development of modern cities, to name a few.

You will have the chance to undertake a placement in your second year, giving you first-hand experience of the workplace and plenty of skills to add to your CV.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

Course Features

  • Study abroad option
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • TEF Silver Award
  • University accommodation
  • A number of UK based field trips fully paid for by the school
  • Partially subsidised international field trip opportunities available
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Entry Requirements

112
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

Mature Applicants:

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. All students will be considered through the contextual admissions policy described above. If you do not meet the requirements through the contextual admissions policy, we may still be able to make you an offer if you have recent relevant work experience through our ‘Recognition of Prior Learning’ policy. Please ensure that you list both your qualifications and any relevant work experience in your application so that we can consider you under both schemes where applicable..

All applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, for example we accept some Functional Skills Tests. 

UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Holly Gilpin

Careers

Holly Gilpin
Visitor Assistant Leeds Art Gallery

BA (Hons) History

“History was always my favourite subject at school and my course focused on social and cultural history which is my passion. By studying major events in world history, from the French Revolution to the Cold War, I'm now able to bring my interpretations of exhibitions and artworks to life and keep my visitors thoroughly engaged.

Teaching and learning

The modules you study throughout this joint degree will give you a thorough grounding in both human geography and history, encouraging you to identify and explore instances where the two disciplines may inform or enhance once another. You will take part in a variety of teaching activities, including lectures, seminars and field trips, and in your second year a placement will give you the opportunity to learn in the workplace. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study – the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
Download 2019/20 Course Spec Download
An introduction to a wide range of key ideas within human geography and history, your modules will help you develop the essential skills and approaches you will need to succeed on the course. Each core module will explore one of the various ways in which the concepts of people, place, history and culture are regarded by geographers and historians.
Overall workload
Clock icon
265 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
935 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions

Year one is assessed by coursework predominantly, with some examinations.

 

Core Modules

A look at the enormous social and cultural changes of the nineteenth century, during which Britain became widely known as 'the first industrial nation'.

Through case studies of a series of contemporary events and media prominent in the public domain, you will learn the importance of the geographical discipline in understanding the world we live in.

Gain an understanding of how to apply the principles of sustainable development to the cities and towns we live in. You will take a field trip to a European city to see aspects of sustainability in practice.

You will examine the histories of relocation, cultural encounter, and migration that have shaped the modern world from voyages of exploration to twentieth-century political conflict.

You will examine the social, cultural and political experience of Europeans during a century of tumultuous change. It begins with the First World War and ends with the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the end of Cold War politics.

Study the dynamics which underpin contested spaces and explore the importance of place, territory, power and identity.

In your second year you will gain in-depth knowledge of key geographical and historical concepts, theories and debates and assess their application in the real world. You will focus on developing your employability and research skills through the Placement & Professional Skills module.
Overall workload
Clock icon
264 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
866 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
70 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions

Year two is assessed by coursework predominantly, with some practical assessments.

 

Core Modules

An introduction to the study of environmental history, you will consider the shaping of the modern British landscape and the interpretation of the landscape in different media, including visual art, material culture and literary fiction.

Examine the evolution of thought in human geography, making connections between the development of geography over time, developments in academic thought and practice, and the ways in which we produce geographical knowledge.

Enhance your professional skills on a ten-week work placement. Working with a local employer, you will develop your graduate attributes and reflect on the transferable skills you will need for your chosen career.

Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.

Examine four case studies to gain an understanding of the key themes involved in slavery and forced labour in the British Empire.

Explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.

During the final year, you will be able to focus on an area of interest by choosing from a diverse list of option modules. The only core module is your dissertation, which will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your independent learning skills and specialist knowledge in both subject areas.
Overall workload
Clock icon
224 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
976 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Year three is assessed by coursework predominantly, with some examinations
Core Modules

Make use of the research methods and techniques you have learned and the skills you have gained during your course to carry out a sustained piece of research and to write this up in the form of a clearly argued and coherently structured dissertation.

Option modules may include:

Examine the relationship between women and the built environment, thinking about women as designers, planners and builders. You will also look at the spaces inhabited by women, those designed for them, and those adopted by them.

Discover the multiple and frequently contested ways of understanding, representing and communicating social space and place. You will examine a number of key issues through the concept of the geographical imagination.

Develop your critical understanding and knowledge of heritage conservation theory and practice and its relation to urban regeneration and renaissance in the UK.

Study the complex and contested history of 20th-century South Africa focusing on the development, implementation and aftermaths of the apartheid system of racial segregation and discrimination.

Trace the history of British holidaymaking abroad from the 'Grand Tour' to the package deal by considering motives for and experiences of travel.

Explore the role the street has played since the mid-nineteenth century in shaping our lives and identities. You will study the everyday lives of urban dwellers who used streets for work, leisure, travel and living in its many legal and illegal ways.

The questions of what it means to be British and what constitutes `Britishness?, continue to spark debate - discover the social and political history of British national identity from the Act of Union with Scotland to the EU referendum.

Follow the history of communism in Eastern Europe from its initial spread across the region after World War II to its collapse in the revolutions of 1989/90.

Explores the origins of modern environmentalism, examining the development of ideas and beliefs about nature and its conservation on a worldwide scale over the past two centuries.

Examine the major political, economic, social and cultural developments in Italian history from the beginning of the country's national resurgence during the late 18th century through to the present day.

Consider the social, political and cultural histories of Paris in the 19th century, starting with Napoleon's demise in 1815.

Examine the main trends and challenges facing cities, as well as the range of alternative practices which are being discussed within academic literature and experimented with directly by urban inhabitants.

A detailed and critical examination of the complexity of retail and consumption geographies, this module will demonstrate how consumption has been, and continues to be, key to understanding how our city spaces, cultures and societies are constructed and spatialised.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
An introduction to a wide range of key ideas within human geography and history, your modules will help you develop the essential skills and approaches you will need to succeed on the course. Each core module will explore one of the various ways in which the concepts of people, place, history and culture are regarded by geographers and historians.
Overall workload
Clock icon
265 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
935 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions

Year one is assessed by coursework predominantly, with some examinations.

 

Core Modules

A look at the enormous social and cultural changes of the nineteenth century, during which Britain became widely known as 'the first industrial nation'.

Through case studies of a series of contemporary events and media prominent in the public domain, you will learn the importance of the geographical discipline in understanding the world we live in.

Gain an understanding of how to apply the principles of sustainable development to the cities and towns we live in. You will take a field trip to a European city to see aspects of sustainability in practice.

You will examine the histories of relocation, cultural encounter, and migration that have shaped the modern world from voyages of exploration to twentieth-century political conflict.

You will examine the social, cultural and political experience of Europeans during a century of tumultuous change. It begins with the First World War and ends with the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the end of Cold War politics.

Study the dynamics which underpin contested spaces and explore the importance of place, territory, power and identity.

In your second year you will gain in-depth knowledge of key geographical and historical concepts, theories and debates and assess their application in the real world. You will focus on developing your employability and research skills through the Placement & Professional Skills module.
Overall workload
Clock icon
264 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
866 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
70 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions

Year two is assessed by coursework predominantly, with some practical assessments.

 

Core Modules

An introduction to the study of environmental history, you will consider the shaping of the modern British landscape and the interpretation of the landscape in different media, including visual art, material culture and literary fiction.

Examine the evolution of thought in human geography, making connections between the development of geography over time, developments in academic thought and practice, and the ways in which we produce geographical knowledge.

Enhance your professional skills on a ten-week work placement. Working with a local employer, you will develop your graduate attributes and reflect on the transferable skills you will need for your chosen career.

Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.

Examine four case studies to gain an understanding of the key themes involved in slavery and forced labour in the British Empire.

Explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.

During the final year, you will be able to focus on an area of interest by choosing from a diverse list of option modules. The only core module is your dissertation, which will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your independent learning skills and specialist knowledge in both subject areas.
Overall workload
Clock icon
224 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
976 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Year three is assessed by coursework predominantly, with some examinations
Core Modules

Make use of the research methods and techniques you have learned and the skills you have gained during your course to carry out a sustained piece of research and to write this up in the form of a clearly argued and coherently structured dissertation.

Option modules may include:

Examine the relationship between women and the built environment, thinking about women as designers, planners and builders. You will also look at the spaces inhabited by women, those designed for them, and those adopted by them.

Discover the multiple and frequently contested ways of understanding, representing and communicating social space and place. You will examine a number of key issues through the concept of the geographical imagination.

Develop your critical understanding and knowledge of heritage conservation theory and practice and its relation to urban regeneration and renaissance in the UK.

Study the complex and contested history of 20th-century South Africa focusing on the development, implementation and aftermaths of the apartheid system of racial segregation and discrimination.

Trace the history of British holidaymaking abroad from the 'Grand Tour' to the package deal by considering motives for and experiences of travel.

Explore the role the street has played since the mid-nineteenth century in shaping our lives and identities. You will study the everyday lives of urban dwellers who used streets for work, leisure, travel and living in its many legal and illegal ways.

The questions of what it means to be British and what constitutes `Britishness?, continue to spark debate - discover the social and political history of British national identity from the Act of Union with Scotland to the EU referendum.

Follow the history of communism in Eastern Europe from its initial spread across the region after World War II to its collapse in the revolutions of 1989/90.

Explores the origins of modern environmentalism, examining the development of ideas and beliefs about nature and its conservation on a worldwide scale over the past two centuries.

Examine the major political, economic, social and cultural developments in Italian history from the beginning of the country's national resurgence during the late 18th century through to the present day.

Consider the social, political and cultural histories of Paris in the 19th century, starting with Napoleon's demise in 1815.

Examine the main trends and challenges facing cities, as well as the range of alternative practices which are being discussed within academic literature and experimented with directly by urban inhabitants.

A detailed and critical examination of the complexity of retail and consumption geographies, this module will demonstrate how consumption has been, and continues to be, key to understanding how our city spaces, cultures and societies are constructed and spatialised.

Dr Stephen Mosley
Dr Stephen Mosley
Senior Lecturer

Stephen is an expert in environmental history and is particularly interested in pollution problems and their impacts on people and the planet. He has published several books, including The Environment in World History which examines the processes that have transformed the earth and put growing pressure on natural resources. He serves on the advisory boards of the journal Environment and History and the online guide Oxford Bibliographies in Environmental Science.

Many modules on the new Human Geography and History curriculum are enriched by research informed teaching, including my own on ‘Landscapes of History’. Exploring how ideas as well as actions have shaped landscapes over time allows us to see the human ‘footprint’ on the earth more clearly.
Dr Max Hope
Dr Max Hope
Course Director

Dr Max Hope is a Principal Lecturer and Course Director of Postgraduate Courses in Planning, Housing and Human Geography.

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Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Optional overseas field trips are subsidised – the University will cover approximately 60% of the cost of the trip. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module. You will need to pay around 35% of the total cost of the trip. The remaining 65% of the cost is met by the University)

Course-specific optional costs

  • Year 1 field trip to Lille
    (This trip is an optional part of the Sustainable Places module in year 1. You do not have to take part in this trip to pass the module, but it is strongly recommended. You will need to pay around 40% of the cost of the trip (not including subsistence. The remaining 60% of the cost is funded through the School))

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2020/21 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Partially subsidised international field trip opportunities available. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.
  • A number of UK based field trips fully paid for by the school

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the optional International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module if you choose to study this option. You will need to pay around £150 - approximately 35% of the total cost of the trip. The majority of the cost is met by the university.)

Course-specific optional costs

  • Year 1 European field trip
    (This trip is an optional part of the Sustainable Places module in year 1. You do not have to take part in this trip to pass the module, but it is strongly recommended. You will need to pay approximately £150 – no more than 40% of the cost of the trip (not including subsistence). The majority of the cost is funded through the school.)

 

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2020/21 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Partially subsidised international field trip opportunities available. Previous field trips have included Lille, Hamburg and Lithuania.
  • A number of UK based field trips fully paid for by the school

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • Year 2 International field trip
    (Year 2 trips form part of the optional International Field Trip module and are a compulsory requirement of passing the module if you choose to study this option. You will need to pay around £150 - approximately 35% of the total cost of the trip. The majority of the cost is met by the university.)

Course-specific optional costs

  • Year 1 European field trip
    (This trip is an optional part of the Sustainable Places module in year 1. You do not have to take part in this trip to pass the module, but it is strongly recommended. You will need to pay approximately £150 – no more than 40% of the cost of the trip (not including subsistence). The majority of the cost is funded through the school.)

 

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Facilities

  • Broadcasting Place
    Broadcasting Place

    Officially one of the world’s best tall buildings and a big talking point in Leeds, Broadcasting Place is home to our cultural studies and humanities courses. It offers a space for students to join an academic community that plays an active role in shaping contemporary debates about the future direction of those disciplines.

  • Northern Terrace
    Northern Terrace

    Based at our City Campus, only a short walk from Leeds city centre, Northern Terrace is home to our School of Built Environment & Engineering.

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Gym and Sports Facilities
    Gym and Sports Facilities

    Keeping fit is easy at Leeds Beckett - our fitness suites are easy to get to, kitted out with all the latest technology and available to all sports members.

Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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