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Graduate Natalie Milnes
Undergraduate course
Bachelor of Laws (LLB)

Law with Criminology

Law with Criminology

Law with Criminology

Law with Criminology

Law with Criminology

Overview

This course combines the essential elements of a law degree with the study of criminology to enable you to gain an insight into criminal behaviour, policing and criminal justice. Your legal studies will be enhanced by your understanding of criminology as you explore current responses to crime and develop your understanding of case law and legislationAs a student of Leeds Law School, you will be able to access a wide range of law textbooks online for free through Law Trove, a subscription-only service offered by Oxford University Press.

As a qualifying law degree, this course is recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board as meeting the academic requirements of your legal training, and completion will enable you to undertake further study in order to become a solicitor or barrister.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total. Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Changes to legal education and training
Legal education and training has been subject to a detailed review by professional regulators in the legal sector. The review has examined the routes to qualification as a solicitor or barrister.

The Bar Standards Board (BSB) no longer requires the study of a 'Qualifying Law Degree' (QLD), however, the study of what are referred to as the 'legal foundations of knowledge' is still required before the vocational stage of bar training. All our undergraduate law degrees meet this requirement. The changes to the routes to qualification as a solicitor are due to be finalised in the summer of 2020, with the introduction of those changes provisionally from September 2021 onwards. 

Applicants and prospective applicants are invited to find out more about the changes at our open days and applicant days. In addition, the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) and the Bar Standards Board (BSB) have issued a common protocol for guidance. This can be found by visiting the SRA web pages Solicitors Qualifying Examination and Common Protocol on the Academic Stage of training.

Our guest lecture series sees leading figures from the legal profession visit Leeds Law School to share their ideas and experience. You will have access to the lectures digitally, so you can benefit even if you are unable to attend in person. Past speakers have included politician and human rights activist Baroness Chakrabarti and Keir Starmer QC, Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union.

Leeds Law School will support you to attend events that will cultivate a range of skills to prepare you for the work place, as well giving you opportunities to meet a variety of employers from legal and non-legal professionals who could help you plan your career path.

You will have the opportunity to add valuable experience to your CV during your third year through the University's study or work abroad programme.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

To study this course, you will require broadband internet connection with a speed of 2mbps and working speakers. You will need Windows 7 / Mac OSX 10.8 or above and have access to Chrome v63 or higher (recommended), Edge v42+, Firefox v57+ or Safari v6+. Java and Adobe Acrobat Reader will need to be enabled and you will need a minimum screen resolution of 1024 x 768.

Visit our distance learning guide for a complete list of technical requirements.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Course Features

  • 24/7 Library
  • TEF Silver Award
  • Part-time study available
  • Sandwich year
  • Law Trove, a wide range of textbooks accessible to you free online
Transforming law: "We must ensure that our legal education keeps pace with social, economic, technological and political evolution." - Deveral Capps - Leeds Law School / "Well designed law degrees provide a unique skillset that means our students can make a real contribution in a changing world" - Dr Jessica Guth - Leeds Law School-
Law at Leeds Law School
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Law at Leeds Law School
LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology, Coreen Motsi
Play LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology, Coreen Motsi Video
LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology, Coreen Motsi

Entry Requirements

112
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

Mature Applicants:

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. All students will be considered through the contextual admissions policy described above. If you do not meet the requirements through the contextual admissions policy, we may still be able to make you an offer if you have recent relevant work experience through our ‘Recognition of Prior Learning’ policy. Please ensure that you list both your qualifications and any relevant work experience in your application so that we can consider you under both schemes where applicable..

All applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, for example we accept some Functional Skills Tests. 

UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

25 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Natalie Milnes

Careers

Natalie Milnes
Real Estate Associate DLA Piper

LLB (Hons) Law

“From a young age, I was keen to work in the legal field. My degree triggered my interest in property law and laid the foundations for a really stimulating career. I now specialise in commercial property and manage the portfolios of some big-name clients.

Teaching and learning

We regularly review our courses to ensure we are offering you the best educational experience. This course is being reviewed for 2021 entry, therefore the information below is correct for students joining us in 2020/21, but there may be changes for students who wish to join us in 2021/22. These will be confirmed in the course specification made available to new applicants on this page from June 2020.

This is a qualifying law degree and you will gain the knowledge and skills you will need to become professionally qualified. You will be able to analyse and challenge contemporary issues in law and specialise to match your career aspirations through criminology and law option modules. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study – the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.

You will experience a blended approach to teaching and learning - this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and remote teaching and learning. The learning content you receive will be as planned for the academic year 2020/2021 before the Covid-19 outbreak. To find out more about teaching on your course visit the Leeds Law School - Teaching 2020-21 page.

You will experience a blended approach to teaching and learning - this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and remote teaching and learning. The learning content you receive will be as planned for the academic year 2020/2021 before the Covid-19 outbreak. To find out more about teaching on your course visit the Leeds Law School - Teaching 2020-21 page.

You will study six core law modules in your first year. Five of the modules will see you study law foundation subjects and one will enable you to start planning your career and developing your employability skills.
Overall workload
Clock icon
288 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
912 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions

Year one is assessed by course work predominantly, with some examinations and practical assessments.

 

Core Modules

This module will enhance your employability skills and enable you to practise demonstrating those skills. You will be introduced to recruitment and selection procedures and you will have the opportunity to reflect on your own skills and attributes.

Develop the knowledge required to understand and apply the criminal law. You will learn to approach the question of liability in a logical way and to undertake independent research to find legal solutions.

This module will introduce you to the study of law and the English legal system. You will start to develop the key skills you will need to acquire and apply legal knowledge, and you will gain an understanding the personnel, structure, the law making and the judicial reasoning process within the English legal system. You will learn to research and analyse primary sources of law and authoritative secondary sources.

Start to understand the key concepts of public law by studying the relationships between the institutions of state. You will gain an insight into the historical progression of the UK constitution and developments over the last 50 years of international treaties and agreements that have contributed to it. You will study a variety of topics including the rule of law, human rights and judicial review.

Study how a contract is created before looking at terms of a contract that determine the obligations of each party, as well as specific terms concerned with liability. You will also consider the remedies and damages available in the event of a breach of contract.

Study the circumstances in which organisations and individuals who have suffered harm at the hands of others might be able to claim compensation from the wrongdoer. Initially, you will concentrate on negligence before studying other key and topical areas such trespass to the person.

You will further develop your knowledge and understanding of the law foundation subjects across four law foundation modules, which you will study two per semester. In addition, you will complete one core criminology module per semester.
Overall workload
Clock icon
288 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
912 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions

Year two is assessed by a broadly even mix of examination and coursework, with some practical assessments.

 

Core Modules

Build on the knowledge you gained in the first year criminal law module. You will focus on developing the skills and ability to apply legal theory in practice.

In this module you will look at how and why trusts are created, including the different forms of trust, their legal frameworks, the principles of equity affecting their creation and the use of trusts in practice. You will also consider the statutory and equitable rules that govern the way in which a private trust is managed including asset management and distribution and the appointment retirement and removal of trustees.

Build on the knowledge you developed in your first year of study concerning the law of the UK constitution. You will explore the law of the European Union by examining the structure and status of the law of the EU and its relationship to the national laws of the Member States. You will investigate the key legal doctrines of the law of the EU and the specific application of the law of the EU in certain selected substantive legal contexts.

Policing & Social Control

Understand the concept of land and the difference between real and personal property. You will study a range of topics including the nature of property rights and personal rights, leases and leasehold covenants, and mortgages.

Explore the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice; how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system; and how responses are increasingly required to show awareness of the reach and impact of harm.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

In your third year you will study one core criminology module per semester. In addition, you will choose to complete either four law modules across the year, or three law modules and one criminology module.
Overall workload
Clock icon
216 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
984 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
112 (optional) hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions
Year three core modules are assessed entirely by course work. The overall assessment balance will depend on the option modules you select. 
Core Modules
Current Issues in Criminal Justice

Plus choose one of the four modules listed below:

Domestic Violence & Sexual Offending

Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.

Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

Critically examine terrorism, policing and security from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will analyse how terrorism, policing and security have emerged as political and law enforcement priorities and analyse the impact this has had in the respective areas of human rights, civil liberties and the criminalisation of particular groups in society. You will be equipped with the ability to think independently and critically about terrorism, policing and security while at the same time challenging orthodox understandings of the subject matter.

This module will examine the legal controls on anti-competitive agreements and abuses of dominant market positions by undertakings. The EU’s competition rules will provide the principal framework for this module and your learning will be supplemented by examining some of the more recent developments in the UK’s national antitrust rules.

Option modules may include:

Develop a practical understanding of the civil litigation process that a legal practitioner would use to advise a client, as well as relevant professional conduct rules. You will need to complete this module if you choose the CILEx pathway.

Understand the role of negotiation, good practice in legal writing, professional conduct issues and the importance of client care within legal practice.

Gain a theoretical and practical understanding of companies as legal entities. You will explore companies as a form of business organisation and consider both the legal relationships between the participants in a company and the impact of companies as legal entities on society as a whole. You will be encouraged to consider the economic, social and political role of company law.

Gain the knowledge you will need to complete each of the critical stages of a property transaction. You will focus on the residential conveyancing of leasehold and freehold property and land.

Examine the law and procedure in relation to evidence gathering by the police during a criminal investigation, including pro-active investigation techniques and practice and procedure in the police station.

Undertake a placement (whether paid or otherwise) for one semester during your third year of study. You will gain exposure to the workplace environment of an organisation and you will have opportunities to utilise the knowledge and skills you developed during your first two years of undergraduate study.

Gain an in-depth understanding of the law and legal framework relating to the individual employer/employee relationship. This module will encompass the broader social, economic, political, historical, philosophical, moral and cultural context of employment law. It will consider the employer/employee relationship and the effect and impact of statutory intervention.

This module will see you analyse and evaluate the development and application of common law principles and statutory provisions that govern the employer/employee relationship in order to present a critical evaluation of scenario questions.

You will carry out an in-depth research project in a subject area that is appropriate to the course and of particular interest to you.

Study the key intellectual property areas of copyright, trademarks, patents, the law of confidence and design rights. You will explore topics including the legal requirements for each intellectual property right (IPR), how each IPR might be infringed, and the application of the relevant laws in problem-based realistic scenarios.

Explore the principles and application of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You will consider the international human rights framework with reference to the role and function of the United Nations, and the systems and institutions that seek to protect and promote human rights. This module will focus on civil and political rights, economic, social and cultural rights, torture and the rights of prisoners.

Gain experience and apply your knowledge and skills in a practical setting by offering pro bono legal advice. You will be supervised by a practising solicitor while you are involved in interviewing, researching and providing written advice to clients across a range of areas of law. This module will introduce you to a client-focused role in a professional setting that follows strict procedural and operational rules.

Develop analytical and critical thinking as well as writing skills by exploring law as portrayed through literature, photography, film, art, TV, popular culture.

This module will enable you to analyse the media and entertainment law industries in a contemporary context, both in terms of its practical application and its theoretical framework. You will study key aspects such as broadcasting, the printed press, the music industry, online news and entertainment, and social networking sites. Your studies will also cover the law relating to intellectual property for the entertainment industry.

Develop your ability to evaluate the development of terrorism internationally, the UK’s counter terrorism strategies and assess the impact of terrorism on civil liberties.

Develop individual, transferable, personal, intellectual and subject related and/or professional skills and competencies through work experience.

You will study six core law modules in your first year. Five of the modules will see you study law foundation subjects and one will enable you to start planning your career and developing your employability skills.
Overall workload
Clock icon
288 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
912 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions

Year one is assessed by course work predominantly, with some examinations and practical assessments.

 

Core Modules

This module will enhance your employability skills and enable you to practise demonstrating those skills. You will be introduced to recruitment and selection procedures and you will have the opportunity to reflect on your own skills and attributes.

Develop the knowledge required to understand and apply the criminal law. You will learn to approach the question of liability in a logical way and to undertake independent research to find legal solutions.

This module will introduce you to the study of law and the English legal system. You will start to develop the key skills you will need to acquire and apply legal knowledge, and you will gain an understanding the personnel, structure, the law making and the judicial reasoning process within the English legal system. You will learn to research and analyse primary sources of law and authoritative secondary sources.

Start to understand the key concepts of public law by studying the relationships between the institutions of state. You will gain an insight into the historical progression of the UK constitution and developments over the last 50 years of international treaties and agreements that have contributed to it. You will study a variety of topics including the rule of law, human rights and judicial review.

Study how a contract is created before looking at terms of a contract that determine the obligations of each party, as well as specific terms concerned with liability. You will also consider the remedies and damages available in the event of a breach of contract.

Study the circumstances in which organisations and individuals who have suffered harm at the hands of others might be able to claim compensation from the wrongdoer. Initially, you will concentrate on negligence before studying other key and topical areas such trespass to the person.

You will further develop your knowledge and understanding of the law foundation subjects across four law foundation modules, which you will study two per semester. In addition, you will complete one core criminology module per semester.
Overall workload
Clock icon
288 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
912 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions

Year two is assessed by a broadly even mix of examination and coursework, with some practical assessments.

 

Core Modules

Build on the knowledge you gained in the first year criminal law module. You will focus on developing the skills and ability to apply legal theory in practice.

In this module you will look at how and why trusts are created, including the different forms of trust, their legal frameworks, the principles of equity affecting their creation and the use of trusts in practice. You will also consider the statutory and equitable rules that govern the way in which a private trust is managed including asset management and distribution and the appointment retirement and removal of trustees.

Build on the knowledge you developed in your first year of study concerning the law of the UK constitution. You will explore the law of the European Union by examining the structure and status of the law of the EU and its relationship to the national laws of the Member States. You will investigate the key legal doctrines of the law of the EU and the specific application of the law of the EU in certain selected substantive legal contexts.

Policing & Social Control

Understand the concept of land and the difference between real and personal property. You will study a range of topics including the nature of property rights and personal rights, leases and leasehold covenants, and mortgages.

Explore the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice; how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system; and how responses are increasingly required to show awareness of the reach and impact of harm.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

In your third year you will study one core criminology module per semester. In addition, you will choose to complete either four law modules across the year, or three law modules and one criminology module.
Overall workload
Clock icon
216 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
984 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
112 (optional) hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions
Year three core modules are assessed entirely by course work. The overall assessment balance will depend on the option modules you select. 
Core Modules
Current Issues in Criminal Justice

Plus choose one of the four modules listed below:

Domestic Violence & Sexual Offending

Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.

Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

Critically examine terrorism, policing and security from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will analyse how terrorism, policing and security have emerged as political and law enforcement priorities and analyse the impact this has had in the respective areas of human rights, civil liberties and the criminalisation of particular groups in society. You will be equipped with the ability to think independently and critically about terrorism, policing and security while at the same time challenging orthodox understandings of the subject matter.

This module will examine the legal controls on anti-competitive agreements and abuses of dominant market positions by undertakings. The EU’s competition rules will provide the principal framework for this module and your learning will be supplemented by examining some of the more recent developments in the UK’s national antitrust rules.

Option modules may include:

Develop a practical understanding of the civil litigation process that a legal practitioner would use to advise a client, as well as relevant professional conduct rules. You will need to complete this module if you choose the CILEx pathway.

Understand the role of negotiation, good practice in legal writing, professional conduct issues and the importance of client care within legal practice.

Gain a theoretical and practical understanding of companies as legal entities. You will explore companies as a form of business organisation and consider both the legal relationships between the participants in a company and the impact of companies as legal entities on society as a whole. You will be encouraged to consider the economic, social and political role of company law.

Gain the knowledge you will need to complete each of the critical stages of a property transaction. You will focus on the residential conveyancing of leasehold and freehold property and land.

Examine the law and procedure in relation to evidence gathering by the police during a criminal investigation, including pro-active investigation techniques and practice and procedure in the police station.

Undertake a placement (whether paid or otherwise) for one semester during your third year of study. You will gain exposure to the workplace environment of an organisation and you will have opportunities to utilise the knowledge and skills you developed during your first two years of undergraduate study.

Gain an in-depth understanding of the law and legal framework relating to the individual employer/employee relationship. This module will encompass the broader social, economic, political, historical, philosophical, moral and cultural context of employment law. It will consider the employer/employee relationship and the effect and impact of statutory intervention.

This module will see you analyse and evaluate the development and application of common law principles and statutory provisions that govern the employer/employee relationship in order to present a critical evaluation of scenario questions.

You will carry out an in-depth research project in a subject area that is appropriate to the course and of particular interest to you.

Study the key intellectual property areas of copyright, trademarks, patents, the law of confidence and design rights. You will explore topics including the legal requirements for each intellectual property right (IPR), how each IPR might be infringed, and the application of the relevant laws in problem-based realistic scenarios.

Explore the principles and application of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You will consider the international human rights framework with reference to the role and function of the United Nations, and the systems and institutions that seek to protect and promote human rights. This module will focus on civil and political rights, economic, social and cultural rights, torture and the rights of prisoners.

Gain experience and apply your knowledge and skills in a practical setting by offering pro bono legal advice. You will be supervised by a practising solicitor while you are involved in interviewing, researching and providing written advice to clients across a range of areas of law. This module will introduce you to a client-focused role in a professional setting that follows strict procedural and operational rules.

Develop analytical and critical thinking as well as writing skills by exploring law as portrayed through literature, photography, film, art, TV, popular culture.

This module will enable you to analyse the media and entertainment law industries in a contemporary context, both in terms of its practical application and its theoretical framework. You will study key aspects such as broadcasting, the printed press, the music industry, online news and entertainment, and social networking sites. Your studies will also cover the law relating to intellectual property for the entertainment industry.

Develop your ability to evaluate the development of terrorism internationally, the UK’s counter terrorism strategies and assess the impact of terrorism on civil liberties.

Develop individual, transferable, personal, intellectual and subject related and/or professional skills and competencies through work experience.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
Core Modules

This module will enhance your employability skills and enable you to practise demonstrating those skills. You will be introduced to recruitment and selection procedures and you will have the opportunity to reflect on your own skills and attributes.

Develop the knowledge required to understand and apply the criminal law. You will learn to approach the question of liability in a logical way and to undertake independent research to find legal solutions.

This module will introduce you to the study of law and the English legal system. You will start to develop the key skills you will need to acquire and apply legal knowledge, and you will gain an understanding the personnel, structure, the law making and the judicial reasoning process within the English legal system. You will learn to research and analyse primary sources of law and authoritative secondary sources.

Start to understand the key concepts of public law by studying the relationships between the institutions of state. You will gain an insight into the historical progression of the UK constitution and developments over the last 50 years of international treaties and agreements that have contributed to it. You will study a variety of topics including the rule of law, human rights and judicial review.

Study how a contract is created before looking at terms of a contract that determine the obligations of each party, as well as specific terms concerned with liability. You will also consider the remedies and damages available in the event of a breach of contract.

Study the circumstances in which organisations and individuals who have suffered harm at the hands of others might be able to claim compensation from the wrongdoer. Initially, you will concentrate on negligence before studying other key and topical areas such trespass to the person.

Core Modules

Build on the knowledge you gained in the first year criminal law module. You will focus on developing the skills and ability to apply legal theory in practice.

In this module you will look at how and why trusts are created, including the different forms of trust, their legal frameworks, the principles of equity affecting their creation and the use of trusts in practice. You will also consider the statutory and equitable rules that govern the way in which a private trust is managed including asset management and distribution and the appointment retirement and removal of trustees.

Build on the knowledge you developed in your first year of study concerning the law of the UK constitution. You will explore the law of the European Union by examining the structure and status of the law of the EU and its relationship to the national laws of the Member States. You will investigate the key legal doctrines of the law of the EU and the specific application of the law of the EU in certain selected substantive legal contexts.

Policing & Social Control

Understand the concept of land and the difference between real and personal property. You will study a range of topics including the nature of property rights and personal rights, leases and leasehold covenants, and mortgages.

Explore the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice; how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system; and how responses are increasingly required to show awareness of the reach and impact of harm.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Core Modules

Engage with the development of criminal justice policies at a national and global level, drawing on sociological, social policy and socio-legal perspectives. You will investigate the complex inter-relationships between theory, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice. You will be encouraged to evaluate different sources of knowledge about crime and criminal justice, and focus on the role of academic research in shaping and evaluating criminal justice policies.

Look into competing explanations for acts of violent and sexual offending in both domestic and institutional settings, touching on gender, ethnicity and age issues.

Plus choose from one of the four modules listed below:

Current Issues in Criminal Justice

Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.

Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

Critically examine terrorism, policing and security from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will analyse how terrorism, policing and security have emerged as political and law enforcement priorities and analyse the impact this has had in the respective areas of human rights, civil liberties and the criminalisation of particular groups in society. You will be equipped with the ability to think independently and critically about terrorism, policing and security while at the same time challenging orthodox understandings of the subject matter.

Option modules may include:

Develop a practical understanding of the civil litigation process that a legal practitioner would use to advise a client, as well as relevant professional conduct rules. You will need to complete this module if you choose the CILEx pathway.

Understand the role of negotiation, good practice in legal writing, professional conduct issues and the importance of client care within legal practice.

Gain a theoretical and practical understanding of companies as legal entities. You will explore companies as a form of business organisation and consider both the legal relationships between the participants in a company and the impact of companies as legal entities on society as a whole. You will be encouraged to consider the economic, social and political role of company law.

This module will examine the legal controls on anti-competitive agreements and abuses of dominant market positions by undertakings. The EU’s competition rules will provide the principal framework for this module and your learning will be supplemented by examining some of the more recent developments in the UK’s national antitrust rules.

Gain the knowledge you will need to complete each of the critical stages of a property transaction. You will focus on the residential conveyancing of leasehold and freehold property and land.

Examine the law and procedure in relation to evidence gathering by the police during a criminal investigation, including pro-active investigation techniques and practice and procedure in the police station.

Undertake a placement (whether paid or otherwise) for one semester during your third year of study. You will gain exposure to the workplace environment of an organisation and you will have opportunities to utilise the knowledge and skills you developed during your first two years of undergraduate study.

Gain an in-depth understanding of the law and legal framework relating to the individual employer/employee relationship. This module will encompass the broader social, economic, political, historical, philosophical, moral and cultural context of employment law. It will consider the employer/employee relationship and the effect and impact of statutory intervention.

This module will see you analyse and evaluate the development and application of common law principles and statutory provisions that govern the employer/employee relationship in order to present a critical evaluation of scenario questions.

You will carry out an in-depth research project in a subject area that is appropriate to the course and of particular interest to you.

Study the key intellectual property areas of copyright, trademarks, patents, the law of confidence and design rights. You will explore topics including the legal requirements for each intellectual property right (IPR), how each IPR might be infringed, and the application of the relevant laws in problem-based realistic scenarios.

Explore the principles and application of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You will consider the international human rights framework with reference to the role and function of the United Nations, and the systems and institutions that seek to protect and promote human rights. This module will focus on civil and political rights, economic, social and cultural rights, torture and the rights of prisoners.

Gain experience and apply your knowledge and skills in a practical setting by offering pro bono legal advice. You will be supervised by a practising solicitor while you are involved in interviewing, researching and providing written advice to clients across a range of areas of law. This module will introduce you to a client-focused role in a professional setting that follows strict procedural and operational rules.

Develop analytical and critical thinking as well as writing skills by exploring law as portrayed through literature, photography, film, art, TV, popular culture.

This module will enable you to analyse the media and entertainment law industries in a contemporary context, both in terms of its practical application and its theoretical framework. You will study key aspects such as broadcasting, the printed press, the music industry, online news and entertainment, and social networking sites. Your studies will also cover the law relating to intellectual property for the entertainment industry.

Develop your ability to evaluate the development of terrorism internationally, the UK’s counter terrorism strategies and assess the impact of terrorism on civil liberties.

Develop individual, transferable, personal, intellectual and subject related and/or professional skills and competencies through work experience.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
Core Modules

This module will enhance your employability skills and enable you to practise demonstrating those skills. You will be introduced to recruitment and selection procedures and you will have the opportunity to reflect on your own skills and attributes.

Develop the knowledge required to understand and apply the criminal law. You will learn to approach the question of liability in a logical way and to undertake independent research to find legal solutions.

This module will introduce you to the study of law and the English legal system. You will start to develop the key skills you will need to acquire and apply legal knowledge, and you will gain an understanding the personnel, structure, the law making and the judicial reasoning process within the English legal system. You will learn to research and analyse primary sources of law and authoritative secondary sources.

Start to understand the key concepts of public law by studying the relationships between the institutions of state. You will gain an insight into the historical progression of the UK constitution and developments over the last 50 years of international treaties and agreements that have contributed to it. You will study a variety of topics including the rule of law, human rights and judicial review.

Study how a contract is created before looking at terms of a contract that determine the obligations of each party, as well as specific terms concerned with liability. You will also consider the remedies and damages available in the event of a breach of contract.

Study the circumstances in which organisations and individuals who have suffered harm at the hands of others might be able to claim compensation from the wrongdoer. Initially, you will concentrate on negligence before studying other key and topical areas such trespass to the person.

Core Modules

Build on the knowledge you gained in the first year criminal law module. You will focus on developing the skills and ability to apply legal theory in practice.

In this module you will look at how and why trusts are created, including the different forms of trust, their legal frameworks, the principles of equity affecting their creation and the use of trusts in practice. You will also consider the statutory and equitable rules that govern the way in which a private trust is managed including asset management and distribution and the appointment retirement and removal of trustees.

Build on the knowledge you developed in your first year of study concerning the law of the UK constitution. You will explore the law of the European Union by examining the structure and status of the law of the EU and its relationship to the national laws of the Member States. You will investigate the key legal doctrines of the law of the EU and the specific application of the law of the EU in certain selected substantive legal contexts.

Policing & Social Control

Understand the concept of land and the difference between real and personal property. You will study a range of topics including the nature of property rights and personal rights, leases and leasehold covenants, and mortgages.

Explore the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice; how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system; and how responses are increasingly required to show awareness of the reach and impact of harm.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.

Core Modules

Engage with the development of criminal justice policies at a national and global level, drawing on sociological, social policy and socio-legal perspectives. You will investigate the complex inter-relationships between theory, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice. You will be encouraged to evaluate different sources of knowledge about crime and criminal justice, and focus on the role of academic research in shaping and evaluating criminal justice policies.

Look into competing explanations for acts of violent and sexual offending in both domestic and institutional settings, touching on gender, ethnicity and age issues.

Plus choose from one of the four modules listed below:

Current Issues in Criminal Justice

Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.

Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

Critically examine terrorism, policing and security from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will analyse how terrorism, policing and security have emerged as political and law enforcement priorities and analyse the impact this has had in the respective areas of human rights, civil liberties and the criminalisation of particular groups in society. You will be equipped with the ability to think independently and critically about terrorism, policing and security while at the same time challenging orthodox understandings of the subject matter.

Option modules may include:

Develop a practical understanding of the civil litigation process that a legal practitioner would use to advise a client, as well as relevant professional conduct rules. You will need to complete this module if you choose the CILEx pathway.

Understand the role of negotiation, good practice in legal writing, professional conduct issues and the importance of client care within legal practice.

Gain a theoretical and practical understanding of companies as legal entities. You will explore companies as a form of business organisation and consider both the legal relationships between the participants in a company and the impact of companies as legal entities on society as a whole. You will be encouraged to consider the economic, social and political role of company law.

This module will examine the legal controls on anti-competitive agreements and abuses of dominant market positions by undertakings. The EU’s competition rules will provide the principal framework for this module and your learning will be supplemented by examining some of the more recent developments in the UK’s national antitrust rules.

Gain the knowledge you will need to complete each of the critical stages of a property transaction. You will focus on the residential conveyancing of leasehold and freehold property and land.

Examine the law and procedure in relation to evidence gathering by the police during a criminal investigation, including pro-active investigation techniques and practice and procedure in the police station.

Undertake a placement (whether paid or otherwise) for one semester during your third year of study. You will gain exposure to the workplace environment of an organisation and you will have opportunities to utilise the knowledge and skills you developed during your first two years of undergraduate study.

Gain an in-depth understanding of the law and legal framework relating to the individual employer/employee relationship. This module will encompass the broader social, economic, political, historical, philosophical, moral and cultural context of employment law. It will consider the employer/employee relationship and the effect and impact of statutory intervention.

This module will see you analyse and evaluate the development and application of common law principles and statutory provisions that govern the employer/employee relationship in order to present a critical evaluation of scenario questions.

You will carry out an in-depth research project in a subject area that is appropriate to the course and of particular interest to you.

Study the key intellectual property areas of copyright, trademarks, patents, the law of confidence and design rights. You will explore topics including the legal requirements for each intellectual property right (IPR), how each IPR might be infringed, and the application of the relevant laws in problem-based realistic scenarios.

Explore the principles and application of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You will consider the international human rights framework with reference to the role and function of the United Nations, and the systems and institutions that seek to protect and promote human rights. This module will focus on civil and political rights, economic, social and cultural rights, torture and the rights of prisoners.

Gain experience and apply your knowledge and skills in a practical setting by offering pro bono legal advice. You will be supervised by a practising solicitor while you are involved in interviewing, researching and providing written advice to clients across a range of areas of law. This module will introduce you to a client-focused role in a professional setting that follows strict procedural and operational rules.

Develop analytical and critical thinking as well as writing skills by exploring law as portrayed through literature, photography, film, art, TV, popular culture.

This module will enable you to analyse the media and entertainment law industries in a contemporary context, both in terms of its practical application and its theoretical framework. You will study key aspects such as broadcasting, the printed press, the music industry, online news and entertainment, and social networking sites. Your studies will also cover the law relating to intellectual property for the entertainment industry.

Develop your ability to evaluate the development of terrorism internationally, the UK’s counter terrorism strategies and assess the impact of terrorism on civil liberties.

Develop individual, transferable, personal, intellectual and subject related and/or professional skills and competencies through work experience.

Caroline Owen
Caroline Owen
Senior Lecturer

Caroline is an experienced solicitor with expertise in civil litigation, particularly contract and tort law, and she has worked on high-profile cases for law firms in London and Leeds. She joined Leeds Beckett in 2014 and teaches Tort, Contract and English Legal System, Method & Skills modules at undergraduate level. On the university’s Legal Practice Course, Caroline teaches a variety of legal skills, including practical legal research, writing, interviewing and advising. 

The strength of studying another subject in addition to a qualifying law degree lies in the breadth of opportunities that will be open to you upon graduation. Supplementing your legal knowledge with finance, business or management experience will be a huge asset to you, whether you choose a career in law or follow another path.
Law at Leeds Law School
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Law at Leeds Law School
LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology, Coreen Motsi
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LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology, Coreen Motsi

Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.

Sandwich Year

You will normally spend a whole year in placement. For this year you will be charged a reduced fee of £1385.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies
  • Simulation suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.
  • Courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client.

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essential costs
  • Placement locations and experiences will vary throughout the course and you will need to pay for any additional travel or dual accommodation costs

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

Sandwich Year

You will normally spend a whole year in placement. For this year you will be charged a reduced fee.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Access to course resources, equiptment and facilities, including:
  • Simulation suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.
  • Courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client.
Essential Costs
  • Placement locations and experiences will vary throughout the course and you will need to pay for any additional travel or dual accommodation costs

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

Sandwich Year

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies
  • Simulation suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.
  • Courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client.

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essential costs
  • Placement locations and experiences will vary throughout the course and you will need to pay for any additional travel or dual accommodation costs

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

Sandwich Year

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Access to course resources, equiptment and facilities, including:
  • Simulation suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.
  • Courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client.
Essential Costs
  • Placement locations and experiences will vary throughout the course and you will need to pay for any additional travel or dual accommodation costs

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

Studying part-time gives you the flexibility to learn at your own pace. Because of this, our tuition fees are calculated using credit points. Each module you study has a credit point value. Most modules have a credit point value of 20. The tuition fee for students entering in in 2020/21 on this course is £1541.60 for each 20 credit point module. For modules with a different credit point value their cost can be calculated by multiplying the credit value of the module by the cost per credit point of £77.08. The amount you will pay may increase each year in line with inflation.

Sandwich Year

You will normally spend a whole year in placement. For this year you will be charged a reduced fee of £1385.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies
  • You will have access to the courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client
  • You will have access to the Hydra Suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Optional costs
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement.

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

Fees for this course are not yet confirmed.

Sandwich Year

You will normally spend a whole year in placement. For this year you will be charged a reduced fee of £1800.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Access to course resources, equiptment and facilities, including:
  • You will have access to the courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client
  • You will have access to the Hydra Suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.
Optional Costs
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement.

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2020/21 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Sandwich Year

You will normally spend a whole year in placement. For this year you will be charged a reduced fee of £1385.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies
  • You will have access to the courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client
  • You will have access to the Hydra Suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Optional costs
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement.

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2020/21 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

Sandwich Year

You will normally spend a whole year in placement. For this year you will be charged a reduced fee of £1800.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations. The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Access to course resources, equiptment and facilities, including:
  • You will have access to the courtroom, where you can practise your advocacy skills on-campus and take part in mooting competitions that simulate a court hearing. You will develop your ability to develop and deliver powerful arguments on behalf of your client
  • You will have access to the Hydra Suite, an on-campus system that will help you to develop effective leadership and group participant skills.
Optional Costs
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement.

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (whilst the library provides access to readings recommended for your modules, you may wish to purchase your own copies of some books); you can also make suggestions for books to be added to Library stock; placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you may need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

As well as your mobile phone, you will also need access to a desktop computer and/or laptop to complete assignments and access university online services such as MyBeckett, your virtual learning environment. You can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located in the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive, costs are approximate and will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees. If you choose to study via distance learning, you may not be able to access all of the facilities listed if you are not able to visit us on campus.

Facilities

  • Portland
    Portland

    Leeds Law School is located in Portland, close to the city's legal quarter. Our students can hone their legal expertise in purpose-built facilities, including our very own courtroom.

  • Courtroom
    Courtroom

    Our students can hone their legal expertise in purpose-built facilities, including our very own courtroom.

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, our Library has you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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Your Steps to Leeds Beckett University

We've put together an easy to follow step-by-step guide to applying for a place here at Leeds Beckett University. Here's what you need to do.

  • 1
    Select Your course
    Research the courses on offer and select the right course for you.
    March - September
  • 2
    Apply Through UCAS
    Visit the UCAS website (www.ucas.com) and follow the course application process.
    International students can also apply directly using our downloadable application form.
    For part time courses you can apply directly through our website.
    From September
    Don't FORGET...
    Make Leeds Beckett your first option
  • 3
    Interviews
    Some courses may require you to attend an interview before an offer can be made.
    December - March
    Deadline
    UCAS applications need to be completed by mid-January
  • 4
    Student Finance
    Apply for student finance - tuition loans and maintenance grants.
    January - July
  • 5
    Applicant Days
    Once you have received an offer you will be invited to an Applicant Day.
    January - April
  • 6
    Accommodation
    After accepting your offer, you can apply for our university accommodation.
    February - June
    Deadline
    Your deadline for accepting an offer is May - June
  • 7
    Results
    Confirmation of your place and the start of the clearing process.
    Mid-August
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