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Politics
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

Politics

International Scholarships available

Overview

You will be able to choose from a number of Politics pathways to study*:

  • BA (Hons) Politics
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Global Development
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Peace Studies
  • BA (Hons) Politics with International Relations
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Political Economy
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Human Rights

With the 2017 snap general election, Brexit and the Donald Trump US Presidency, politics is as divisive as ever for those involved in the debate. Critically explore politics and examine some of the pressing issues facing us today, such as climate change, human rights, migration and the crisis of capitalism. You also will explore how the role of the state, international power relations, ethics, and political movements and ideologies such as Marxism have profound implications for the organisation of our society. In your second year and third year, you will have a choice of optional modules and a dissertation, which you can tailor to your interests.

*You can apply to study the single honours degree or one of the combined awards listed below. You also have the option of changing your award at the end of your first year. You will be able to apply direct to UCAS for the combined awards using the UCAS codes provided:

  • BA (Hons) Politics with Global Development (UCAS code L208)
    Explore how global development confronts the ethical dilemmas facing the distribution of power and resources. You will examine theories of development, poverty and economic crises and their relevance to the social and political challenges of the 21st century.
    In Years Two and Three you will study the modules Political Economy of Global South, Understanding Development and Development in Practice, and complete a dissertation.
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Peace Studies (UCAS code L202)
    Understand how international relations have traditionally been conducted and the consequences and limitations of these approaches. You will examine key theories of peace, warfare and security and their relevance and practice in the 21st century.
    In Years Two and Three you will study the modules Theories of Peace, Peace building and Conflict Resolution and Non-Violent Resistance, and complete a dissertation.
  • BA (Hons) Politics with International Relations (UCAS code L201) Critically explore politics and examine some of the pressing issues facing us today, such as climate change, human rights, migration and the crisis of capitalism.
    In Years Two and Three you will study the modules Understanding Security, Environment & World Politics, Rethinking Diplomacy, and complete a dissertation.
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Political Economy (UCAS code L205)
    Political Economy is a crucial tool to understand the relationship between history, economics, the international state system and political power.
    In Years Two and Three you will study the modules Political Economy of Global South, Introduction to Marx and International Political Economy, and complete a dissertation..
  • BA (Hons) Politics with Human Rights (UCAS code L203)
    Many political, economic, social and cultural factors impact the successful protection and promotion of human rights around the world. You will engage with debates about the universality of human rights and assess the success of human rights as a mechanism for social justice.
    In Years Two and Three you will study the modules Debates in Human Rights, International Human Rights and Politics of Human Rights, and complete a dissertation.




Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: 40% of our research in the Psychology unit was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent.
With our range of politics events, volunteering options, study abroad opportunities and guest speakers, you will be able to immerse yourself in a rich learning and practical environment that will fully prepare you for the career you choose.

You will undertake a volunteering placement of your choosing as part of our Active Citizenship module, helping those in need - whether it's assisting with an elderly family member or teaching in a foreign country.

You will have the opportunity to design a mock project targeted at a non-government organisation, where you will practise lobbying your ideas during a test interview, enhancing your employability skills. Previous students have explored ways to limit the problems of globalisation.

All of our course team are research-active, working around the world for the development of society. Many carry out government-funded research and help to advise the EU on policy. These links will help ensure your course content is applicable to the wider world, and could help if you are writing a project or research proposals for international organisations.

You will also benefit from our annual Politics and International Relations Festival, our annual Peace Lecture and our annual Politics Lecture, which have attracted key political figures such as Keir Starmer, Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the EU, Green Party co-leader Caroline Lucas and long-serving Labour politician Roy Hattersley.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

Course Features

  • Placements
  • Part-time study available
  • Study abroad option
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
Play BA (Hons) Politics - Dr Robin Redhead, Course Leader Video
BA (Hons) Politics - Dr Robin Redhead, Course Leader

Entry Requirements

104
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
UCAS Tariff Points: 104 points required. (Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 104 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate: 24 points.

IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website.

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points:104 points required. (Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 104 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate: 24 points.

IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.


More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Nicholas Renn Nichol

Careers

Nicholas Renn Nichol
Managing Director AptART

BSc (Hons) International Relations & Global Development

“The course allowed me the freedom to explore how charities are run and how ethics are imposed within the organisation.

Teaching and learning

Examine, understand and evaluate politics as a human activity with a global outlook, through the ability to study the nature and distribution of power in systems, processes and institutions of governance and comprehend different interpretations of world political events and issues, combining relevant information, exercising critical judgement and constructing reasoned arguments. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
Download Course Spec Download
Year One is a stimulating introduction to the study of politics. You will explore some of the key sub-areas that make up politics as a subject: governance, political ideologies, political economy, world politics, historical context, political theory and politics and society.
Overall workload
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228 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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972 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
14%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
86%
Core Modules

Explore a series of real world concerns as a starting point from which to look at issues in contemporary political theory. By looking at issues such as freedom, equality, violence and rights, you will attempt to provoke critical engagement and reflection on the contested nature of contemporary political theory.

Gain a critical introduction to the history and contemporary evolution of political economy. You will engage with a variety of key historical thinkers and theoretical approaches in order to develop a qualitative understanding of the rich tapestry of political economy.

Understand the the nature and structure of the international system, and how modern states evolve and develop. Consider the evolution of the 20th Century States System, beginning with the decline of pax-Britannica, the inter-war crisis, the emergence of pax-Americana, the establishment and design of key international institutions, the Cold War, the end of the Cold War, rise of non-state actors, globalisation, the decline of the west and the rise of China, the ongoing economic crisis and democratisation.

Politics is fundamentally concerned with governance, which involves making and implementing collective decisions and rules. You will see how this involves a range of actors and institutions and is not just a matter for government or the state. UK governance will be the main focus but the United States will also be referred to in a comparative approach. You will also see how governance operates at multiple levels, not just within a national framework.

Political ideologies may be understood as frameworks of political understanding and commitment that are at the heart of political debate and have helped to shape the world we live in. You will explore the core ideas and beliefs of these major ideologies, to examine debates within and between ideologies, and to develop your own critical thinking in this area.

You will explore aspects of politics in depth, building on learning from Year One. You will extend your skills, knowledge and understanding of research. You will also engage in a volunteering placement which you will reflect upon using relevant knowledge of politics, and through the concept of citizenship. You will also be able to choose from a range of optional modules to develop your intended career prospects and interests.
Overall workload
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250 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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845 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
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106 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
7%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
5%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
88%
Core Modules

Explores the UK's relationship with the EU, and investigate the application of appropriate theory in order to understand both the access of the UK and its decision to exit.

Investigate the concept of citizenship and actively engage with it by undertaking a voluntary placement. This placement will be related to the scope of your course and reflect on their experiences to enhance your employability.

Inequality is everywhere. People are treated differently or affected disproportionately because of their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, disability, and immigration status. In this module you will conduct research on how inequalities are present at local, national and global levels.

You will investigate the nature, development and prospects of the state using a variety of theoretical approaches, and consider big questions about the state, such as: why should we obey the state? who has power and how is political influence exercised? does business exercise unrivalled influence? what are the arguments for `growing' or `shrinking' the state? is globalisation forcing the state to retreat?

Option modules may include:

Study the evolution and dynamics of development in the global south from the period of post-WWII state-led development to contemporary processes of neoliberal globalisation. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical approaches in order to understand concrete empirical issues facing development in the global south.

You will be able to understand international migration in a historical context as a process connecting origin, transit and destination countries, and to think critically and ethically about the causes and impacts of migration for these countries and the diverse responses to it.

Gain an insight into the key concepts, methods and debates within Marxism and develop your capacity to reflect upon the political relevance of Marxism today. The module will be geared towards a critical understanding of capitalism and its evolution as a historically specific mode of production.

Examine the various debates within human rights, looking at the different theoretical frameworks scholars employ in the study and practice of this field. Take specific controversial debates within the field and explore them in depth. You will be challenged to see the complex nature of human rights as a moral framework for political action.

Develop an understanding of the key theories of peace, warfare and security, and their relevance to and practice in the 21st century.

Explore the historical evolution of international human rights law at the United Nations. You will explore what rights are covered by the conventions and how the UN and human rights advocates use these legal mechanisms to promote and protect human rights internationally.

Gain an overview of contemporary security issues, encompassing different perspectives from the state to the individual, and how security threats have changed over time and continue to change.

You will investigate the complexity of local socio-economic development and livelihood security in the global south. Look at current theories, policy and practice of community engagement and poverty alleviation. The local experience of development policy and the influence of donors and global partnerships for development will be examined along with some key poverty alleviation initiatives such as the livelihoods approach, micro-finance and social protection.

At Year Three your modules will provide a culmination to your studies with a focus on Governance, Public Policy, and Research. You will write a dissertation based on an issue and research questions that you identify. You also have further opportunity to choose options that reflect your particular interests.
Overall workload
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183 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
1017 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
15%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
85%
Core Modules

Explore the operation, practice and context of contemporary policy making at the national level. Examine the actors, mechanisms and practice of policy making, and the drivers of policy change, via a focus on specific case studies. You will engage with key decision making theories and models of the policy process, exploring how institutional analyses and other theoretical approaches help to understand the complexity of the policy process.

Focus on a subject of your choosing related to politics and your own future aspirations. You will be required to select a politics-based dissertation topic and to engage with theoretical, methods and empirical material that is appropriate to study in this field. You will identify, plan and deliver a sustained and in-depth piece of work, linking it to theory, and critically reflect on your subject matter and research findings.

Get an introduction to the ideas of global governance and globalisation and the intersection between them. You will begin to think critically about future patterns of world order and their institutionalisation.

Option modules may include:

Study the context of gendered lives in the global south. You will examine the evolution of understanding of gender differences in life chances and experience and the policy and practices to address these and wider gender bias.

Investigate the related issues of terrorism, security and human rights. You will explore the synthesis between the fear of terrorism which is a pervasive threat felt by both states and individuals, the response to these threats that states adopt in creating security policy, and the impact upon human and civil rights.

Understand the context of development management, current policy debates and key practical methodologies of development in practice in the global south. The module is centred around a development planning simulation which culminates in the presentation of project plans to a development planning committee which must decide which to fund in the context of scarce resources.

Through a series of workshops, you will focus on the politics of social justice and nonviolent resistance, the context within which activism takes place, and the key players that undertake the work of social change. You will explore these issues in greater depth through case studies of activism undertaken in particular geographical areas (i.e Africa, Myanmar, Russia, Brazil) as well as on different issues (i.e Corruption, landrights, oppression and environmental protection).

Focus on the politics of human rights movement, the context within which it operates and its key players. Workshops will allow you to explore these issues in greater depth as well as providing the opportunity for group work and practical exercises.

Discover the field of study known as International Political Economy (IPE). You will engage with a variety of theoretical and empirical debates in order to situate and understand the field of IPE and its major object of study globalisation. Emphasis will be placed on how different theoretical approaches seek to understand, reform and critique the contemporary global political economy.

Dr Paul Wetherly
Reader
Dr Paul Wetherly is a Reader in Politics and Course Leader for BA (Hons) Politics.
I enjoy engaging students in discussion, helping them to see other points of view and think critically. What is especially enjoyable about being course leader is the opportunity it gives me for getting to know students well.
Play BA (Hons) Politics - Dr Robin Redhead, Course Leader Video
BA (Hons) Politics - Dr Robin Redhead, Course Leader

Fees & funding

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.
See further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our Bursaries and Scholarships.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year).

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.
See further information on fees and finance on our Financing Your Studies webpage.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year).

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Facilities

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Gym and Sports Facilities
    Gym and Sports Facilities

    Keeping fit is easy at Leeds Beckett - our fitness suites are easy to get to, kitted out with all the latest technology and available to all sports members.

  • Social learning spaces
    Social learning spaces

    Our social learning spaces typically include PCs, desk space and seating areas, enabling you to study and socialise in a relaxed atmosphere.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

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Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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