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Psychology
Undergraduate course
BSc (Hons)

Psychology

International Scholarships available

Overview

You will develop a thorough and critical understanding of psychological theory and research methods, and apply this expertise to your study of human behaviour. You will be encouraged to question why humans act the way they do, delving into specialist areas including drug abuse, clinical and forensic psychology and cognitive neuroscience. You will conduct contemporary psychological research, including laboratory experiments, interviews and focus groups, and you will be assessed on tasks that mirror real-world activities.

Our course is accredited by the British Psychological Society, meeting the requirements for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: 40% of our research in the Psychology unit was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent.

Accredited by:

Take advantage of the diverse and extensive expertise of our staff in areas such as drug addiction, stress, dreams, body image, language, emotion and child development. You'll also meet psychologists and skilled professionals working within psychology who will educate you in how to apply your knowledge in the workplace.

Two weeks of work experience will help build your professional network and give you real world experience. Following this, you'll have the added benefit of being able to talk through and reflect on those experiences when you return to University.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website

Course Features

  • Professional accreditations
  • Placements
  • Part-time study available
  • Specialist facilities
  • Study abroad option
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
Play BSc (Hons) Psychology - Overview Video
BSc (Hons) Psychology - Overview
Play Dr Helen Fawkner, Senior Lecturer Video
Dr Helen Fawkner, Senior Lecturer

Entry Requirements

112
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
UCAS Tariff Points: 112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies. At least 40 of these points must be from a scientific or numerate subject. Subjects can include Psychology, Biology, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry or Geography. If you are studying Biology, Chemistry or Physics to meet this requirement you must also achieve a 'Pass' in the practical assessment, where that practical assessment is separated (from 2017) ).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language, Maths and Science at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards). Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points, in a relevant subject.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate: 25 points (including 6 from Higher Level in a scientific subject).

IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website.

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points:112 points required. (Minimum 72 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies. At least 40 of these points must be from a scientific or numerate subject. Subjects can include Psychology, Biology, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry or Geography. If you are studying Biology, Chemistry or Physics to meet this requirement you must also achieve a 'Pass' in the practical assessment, where that practical assessment is separated (from 2017) ).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language, Maths and Science at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards). Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 112 UCAS tariff points, in a relevant subject.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate: 25 points (including 6 from Higher Level in a scientific subject).

IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.


More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Laura Hudson

Careers

Laura Hudson
Psychology Teacher Lawnswood School in Leeds

BSc (Hons) Psychology

“Leeds Beckett was perfect for me; the atmosphere and facilities were great and the city is bursting with opportunities. If you want to work with people, psychology is ideal as you learn about different aspects of human behaviour and develop loads of transferable skills. My course gave me all the tools I need in my career as a psychology teacher, which I'm really enjoying.

Teaching and learning

The study of psychology will enable you to analyse and explain thoughts, feelings and behaviour in individuals and groups. By studying modules designed and accredited on British Psychological Society benchmarks, you will learn of the significance of the relationship between theory, research and the application of knowledge to real world issues. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
Download Course Spec Download
Study the mind and brain, and how behaviour is determined. You will investigate the impact that the social world has on the development of individuals, and look at the link between psychological approaches and mental health. You will also develop your research methods in psychology.
Overall workload
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242 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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958 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
37%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
22%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
42%
Core Modules

Explore the major perspectives on mental health in psychology, its assessment and therapy/treatment. You will also take a brief overview of the historical perceptions of 'madness'. You will make connections between socio-cultural influences and individual psychopathological behaviour, including the relationship between theory and practice in mental health field.

Develop your theoretical understanding of the scientific method of knowledge acquisition. You will also develop skills in numerical reasoning, statistical analysis (with an emphasis on test of differences), and you will practise communicating the results of research in the form of a research report.

You will be introduced to the main theoretical perspectives and research techniques developed by social and developmental psychologists. You will explore the way in which current issues and topics have been addressed by social and developmental psychologists. The seminar activities and assessment will provide you with the opportunity to consider ways in which psychological knowledge and research is applied.

Develop your critical thinking and reflective learning which are required in all other Psychology modules. It also enables you to practise and master key skills such as literature searching, presenting arguments for a case, essay writing, referencing and reviewing an article.

This module will support you in your learning and understanding of core concept areas in the fields of biological and cognitive psychology. The biological strand introduces students to the basic anatomy of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, and how these underlie behavioural processes such as sleep, emotion, memory, and drug use. The cognitive strand explores the cognitive basis of memory, attention, perception, thinking, learning, emotion, and sleep. Through a combination of lectures and laboratory-based practicals you will gain an understanding of the main theoretical and methodological approaches in both fields.

Develop your theoretical understanding and application of the scientific method, with a particular emphasis on the collection, analysis and presentation of both quantitative and qualitative data. You will also develop your ability to work in small groups to design, implement and analyse small-scale research studies, and you will practice communicating the results of this research in the form of a research report.

Hone your research methods as you look at behavioural neuroscience, psychological development and the psychology of appearance. You will choose from an array of option modules to begin specialising towards a particular discipline.
Overall workload
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224 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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906 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
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70 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
37%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
63%
Core Modules

Further enhance your understanding of the main theories, applications and research techniques developed by developmental psychologists. You will consider the genetic, environmental and learned influences affecting development. You will also explore current issues and topics, taking a lifespan perspective to understand human psychological development.

You will develop an in-depth knowledge of the biological mechanisms underpinning the human visual, sensory and motor systems. The module also introduces the biological theories and treatments of psychopathology. Through a combination of lectures and lab based learning, you will develop transferrable specialised research and technological skills.

Build upon the Intermediate Research Methods module. You will advance your theoretical understanding and application of the scientific-investigative methods with particular emphasis on the assumption, collection, analysis and presentation of both quantitative and qualitative data. You will also develop your ability to use and interpret advanced statistical techniques (e.g., ANOVA, multiple regression) and collect and analyse qualitative data using specific approaches (e.g., Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, Discourse Analysis).

Focus on the key areas within individual differences including: theories of personality; intelligence; emotion; psychometrics; and the application of individual differences in real life situations, with particular reference to principles and methods derived from occupational/work psychology.

Learn about how we think, feel and understand the social world we live in. This will include; how we communicate, think and make sense of our lives and the people we meet in it, how we make sense of ourselves, the relationships we have, and the values we hold about ourselves and others. Lastly you will learn about we may behave and think in the groups we belong to and how we think about and act towards the groups we feel we don't belong to.

Option modules may include:

Understanding of the psychology of appearance. You will explore the array of socio-cultural, physical, psychological and interpersonal factors that influence how people think and feel about their bodies, and how these factors are linked to people's thoughts, feelings and behaviour.

Explore professional practice within a field of psychology as you engage in a real-world project pertinent to one of these fields, and develop transferrable skills that will enhance your employability.

Organisational psychology is a field of study investigating the impact that individuals, groups, and organizational factors have on workplace performance and satisfaction. You will learn how to predict, explain and manage behaviour in the workplace.

Gain an in-depth and critical knowledge on a variety of different areas of psychology that try to understand thinking, identities, experiences and practices associated with womanhood. These areas will range from the study of women and love, women and work, to women and sexuality. You will begin to understand and evaluate the competing and conflicting accounts of womanhood.

Focus on what is commonly held to be the key feature that sets humans apart from other animals, namely language. You will consider how the unique characteristics of language develop from infancy to enable it to play a central role in transforming our psychological functioning.

Develop an in-depth understanding of the social, psychological and biochemical factors relating to drug use and abuse. You will gain knowledge of pharmacokinetics, acute and chronic drug effects and current treatment strategies. Through a combination of lectures and lab based learning, you will develop specialist knowledge and transferrable research and technological skills relevant to careers in the field of addiction e.g. drug rehabilitation, drug counselling, psychopharmacology.

Year Three consolidates your existing knowledge into your final project, where you will be challenged to apply your knowledge of theory, practical research skills and how to apply your findings to the real world. You will also study critical and philosophical issues in psychology, and cognitive psychology and neuropsychology.
Overall workload
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157 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
1043 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
58%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
14%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
28%
Core Modules

Undertake a research project in psychology, and further enhance and showcase the skills you have developed through your study of research methods. In addition, this module has a strong emphasis on self-management and provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate your skills in project management, problem-solving, and independent thought.

Explore the central themes within critical psychology and some philosophical ideas that have informed critical thinking. These will include debates about whether psychology is/should be 'scientific', whether psychology contributes to the oppression or invisibility of certain groups and whether psychology takes sufficient account of context (e.g. cultural, historical, political, ideological, situational etc). You will then move on to consider the ways in which mainstream and critical psychologists have conceptualised and studied things like gender, race, ethnicity, social class, 'normality'/'abnormality' and the self, as well as the limitations and implications of these.

Gain a critical understanding and evaluation of the relationships between brain (neuropsychology) and behaviour (cognitive processing), through learning about case studies and behavioural processes such as memory/amnesia, recognition/agnosias and disorders of consciousness

Option modules may include:

Explore the role of applied health psychology in relation to medical illness and foster a critical understanding of the debates within the field. You will critically evaluate the application of psychological theory (social cognition, health behaviour change) to medical practice, specifically including the design and evaluation of complex health interventions, medical decision making, patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), electronic technologies, collaborative care and patient experience. You will develop your knowledge of applied health psychology in medical practice by exploring contemporary applications of psychological theory to supportive interventions to promote health and monitor disease and empower patients across a range of different health settings.

Extend your knowledge of psychological approaches to identities by drawing upon critical approaches from psychology and a variety of relevant disciplines, such as sociology, geography and cultural studies. You will be able to critically relate psychology to wider interdisciplinary topics relating to identities, representation and power.

Explore contemporary applications of social science theory to develop an applied anti-racist intervention relating to a specific institution such as the discipline of psychology, education and healthcare.

Gain an introduction into the workings of higher-order thought processes of creativity, consciousness and imagination. By learning about theoretical perspectives and current research on these themes within the field of psychology, you will better understand how these complex aspects of cognition and behaviour are essentially intertwined processes that interact seamlessly with one another. This is of vital importance as these operations form the cornerstone of human progress in all domains of knowledge including science and technology, arts and humanities, as well as trade and commerce.

Gain an introduction to clinical and counselling psychology specialisms. You will develop an understanding of a range of common mental health problems, their key symptoms and underlying theoretical explanations (for example, emotional disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, eating disorders and addictions) and the ability to critically evaluate the major approaches in the psychological therapies, which may be drawn upon in the alleviation of these problems.

Study the development of human communication throughout the lifespan. With an emphasis on understanding the multi-faceted nature of communication, the module reviews the practical applications of communication theories.

Apply your knowledge of developmental psychology to real-life situations. You will focus on educational settings, special educational needs and educational psychology, although other careers and settings are considered: working with children will involve working in multidisciplinary teams to some extent. You will also have the opportunity to reflect on and develop ideas for future careers with children.

You will study forensic psychology, which can be thought of as the intersection between psychology and the criminal justice system. It typically covers psychology and crime, and psychology and law. The module also provides varied opportunities for you to apply your knowledge, understanding and critical thinking to fictitious and real-world contexts, and to celebrate your achievements with a wider audience at an end-of-module poster conference.

Learn and understand the psychology and physiology of stress, and its impact on health. You will explore the effects of stress on the immune system, sleeping behaviours, eating behaviours and cognitive performance. Various potentially stress-reducing interventions that may be beneficial to health (e.g. nutritional supplementation and diet; exercise; coping) will also be discussed in order to further encourage understanding of the biopsychological pathways linking stress and health.

Explore the central themes within critical psychology and some philosophical ideas that have informed critical thinking. These will include debates about whether psychology is/should be 'scientific', whether psychology contributes to the oppression or invisibility of certain groups and whether psychology takes sufficient account of context (e.g. cultural, historical, political, ideological, situational etc). You will then move on to consider the ways in which mainstream and critical psychologists have conceptualised and studied things like gender, race, ethnicity, social class, 'normality'/'abnormality' and the self, as well as the limitations and implications of these.

You will focus on what is commonly held to be the key feature that sets humans apart from other animals, namely language. You will contemplate how the unique characteristics of language develop from infancy to enable it to play a central role in transforming our psychological functioning.

You will explore different specialities in health psychology to gain an understanding of why people behave the way they do and how to provide services that will meet individuals' needs and promote health and wellbeing. Health Psychologists have expertise in understanding the things that influence people's health and wellbeing. They explore how people make decisions that might affect their health and in enabling them to make more appropriate or less risky decisions. They also use their expertise in psychology to develop interventions to change behaviour.

Leeds Beckett University
Dr Sabrina Golonka
Senior Lecturer

Dr Sabrina Golonka is a cognitive scientist interested in mechanistic explanations of behaviour (e.g., language use, social entrainment). Her work combines insights from ecological psychology, cognitive psychology, enactivism, and embodied cognition leading to an eclectic theoretical and methodological approach.

We help students develop a life-long love of learning. Graduates who know how to think critically have the broadest horizons - it's the skills, not just the content, that open up career possibilities.
Play BSc (Hons) Psychology - Overview Video
BSc (Hons) Psychology - Overview
Play Dr Helen Fawkner, Senior Lecturer Video
Dr Helen Fawkner, Senior Lecturer

Fees & funding

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.
See further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our Bursaries and Scholarships.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year).
  • You might choose to purchase a student membership of the British Psychological Society
    (Approximately £25 per year).

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.
See further information on fees and finance on our Financing Your Studies webpage.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound
  • When undertaking work placement opportunities, you will need to pay for your travel expenses to and from that placement

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year).
  • You might choose to purchase a student membership of the British Psychological Society
    (Approximately £25 per year).

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs);student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Facilities

  • Biopsychology Laboratory
    Biopsychology Laboratory

    In our ‘CogBio’ lab, you’ll find PCs with specialist software to help you learn how to undertake data analysis and cognitive and biological psychology work.

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Interpersonal Skills Suite
    Interpersonal Skills Suite

    We have plenty of private rooms to allow you to try out your counselling skills. They come equipped with recording facilities so you’re able to reflect on and improve your practice.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

View in Google Maps

Want to know more?

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We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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