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Students in the library
Postgraduate course
MA

Social History

Social History

Social History

International Scholarships available

Overview

Examine the approaches and methods used by historians, and develop your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events of the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Whether working in small groups or individually, you will be guided by an expert teaching team throughout your course. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movements is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Your teaching team will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and also the skills and confidence to conduct your own independent research.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. The School of Cultural Studies & Humanities has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from the expertise of our academic staff in a range of areas, including urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website
Postgraduate Study - Invest in yourself
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Postgraduate Study - Invest in yourself

 

Entry Requirements

Applicants should either have at least a second class honours degree in the cognate subjects of Humanities, Social Sciences, Law or Human Geography, at least a second class honours degree in a non-cognate subject supported by evidence of an aptitude for the subject applied for, or have equivalent experience or training, normally from within the work environment. All applications should be supported by a reference, either academic or professional; a template can be accessed at this link. All applicants should satisfy our University English language requirements, please access further details at this link

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

IELTS:

IELTS 6.5 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu. If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website. Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Applicants should either have at least a second class honours degree in the cognate subjects of Humanities, Social Sciences, Law or Human Geography, at least a second class honours degree in a non-cognate subject supported by evidence of an aptitude for the subject applied for, or have equivalent experience or training, normally from within the work environment. All applications should be supported by a reference, either academic or professional; a template can be accessed at this link. All applicants should satisfy our University English language requirements, please access further details at this link

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

IELTS:

IELTS 6.5 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Lucie Wade

Careers

Lucie Wade

BA (Hons) History, MA Social History, PhD Social History

“My decision to continue studying at Leeds Beckett was inspired by the valuable support I received from my tutors. I felt fully informed about my career options after completing my masters. There was even a careers day tailored specifically to masters students, which helped me to decide my next move, and I’m now preparing to start my PhD.

Teaching and learning

 

This is an introduction to the theories and methods that are core to historical research. You will study research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history using case studies. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how events have been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources. You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Over the last 30 years, there has been an increased interest in life writings, or 'documents of life', which include autobiographies and biographies, diaries, letters, testimonies and oral histories. You will explore questions concerning authenticity, memory, narrative and moral authority and their implications for the use of life writings as historical sources.

You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th Century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Study the emergence of celebrity culture in Europe and North America. You will consider the extent to which modern theories of celebrity can be applied to historic contexts, and we will encourage you to engage with a range of non-traditional source materials, including photographs and other material objects.

Bringing together recent research in environmental history and the histories of food and eating, you will look at how food has been grown, transported and consumed in the western world since the Columbian Exchange of 1492.

Consider journeys, voyages and discoveries as recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs, fiction, letters and ethnographic studies. You will consider these representations against the backdrop of the histories of travel, tourism and exploration.

Combine the study of social, cultural and environmental history to explore the changing relationship between people and their environments. You will focus on the United States, Europe and European settler societies over the last two centuries.

Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Examine the changing nature of public history since the mid-20th Century. You will explore specific case studies and learn about the skills and resources used by public historians.

Drawing on local and national collections, you will discover that studying material culture can illuminate the social and cultural life of the long 18th Century (c.1688/9-1830s).

Victorians in Italy

*These modules rotate on an annual basis. Not all modules listed may be available in your year of entry.

This is an introduction to the theories and methods that are core to historical research. You will study research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history using case studies. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how events have been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources. You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Over the last 30 years, there has been an increased interest in life writings, or 'documents of life', which include autobiographies and biographies, diaries, letters, testimonies and oral histories. You will explore questions concerning authenticity, memory, narrative and moral authority and their implications for the use of life writings as historical sources.

You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th Century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Study the emergence of celebrity culture in Europe and North America. You will consider the extent to which modern theories of celebrity can be applied to historic contexts, and we will encourage you to engage with a range of non-traditional source materials, including photographs and other material objects.

Bringing together recent research in environmental history and the histories of food and eating, you will look at how food has been grown, transported and consumed in the western world since the Columbian Exchange of 1492.

Consider journeys, voyages and discoveries as recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs, fiction, letters and ethnographic studies. You will consider these representations against the backdrop of the histories of travel, tourism and exploration.

Combine the study of social, cultural and environmental history to explore the changing relationship between people and their environments. You will focus on the United States, Europe and European settler societies over the last two centuries.

Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Examine the changing nature of public history since the mid-20th Century. You will explore specific case studies and learn about the skills and resources used by public historians.

Drawing on local and national collections, you will discover that studying material culture can illuminate the social and cultural life of the long 18th Century (c.1688/9-1830s).

Victorians in Italy

*These modules rotate on an annual basis. Not all modules listed may be available in your year of entry.

Dr Rachel Rich
Dr Rachel Rich
Course Director

Rachel Rich is a Senior Lecturer in History. Her interest is the cultural and social history of modern Europe, with a particular interest in class and gender. Her research has focused on food and eating habits and, currently, women's timekeeping practices in nineteenth-century France.

Request a call back from our course team
Postgraduate Study - Invest in yourself
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Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £5950. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £13000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Studying part-time gives you the flexibility to learn at your own pace. Because of this, our tuition fees are calculated using credit points. Each module you study has a credit point value. Most modules have a credit point value of 20. The tuition fee for students entering in in 201920 on this course is £661 for each 20 credit point module. For modules with a different credit point value their cost can be calculated by multiplying the credit value of the module by the cost per credit point of £33.05. The amount you will pay may increase each year in line with inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Part-time rates for international students are not automatically displayed as there are specific visa requirements which generally limit students to study in the UK on a full-time basis. Should you wish to query your visa status you can contact Tier4 Compliance@leedsbeckett.ac.uk. If you are able to study on a part-time basis please contact fees@leedsbeckett.ac.uk for further information on course fees.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Learning spaces

  • Broadcasting Place
    Broadcasting Place

    Officially one of the world’s best tall buildings and a big talking point in Leeds, Broadcasting Place is home to our cultural studies and humanities courses. It offers a space for students to join an academic community that plays an active role in shaping contemporary debates about the future direction of those disciplines.

  • Online resources and collections
    Online resources and collections

    Whether you want to analyse accounts of 17th-century criminal proceedings from the Old Bailey, sift through more than 355,000 works of English and American poetry, prose and drama or explore the world's largest archive of 20th-century popular culture, our Library's online resources provide easy access to a range of diverse collections.

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

Location

Broadcasting Place

Broadcasting Place

Broadcasting place is officially one of the world's best tall buildings (voted the world's 'Best Tall Building' in 2010 by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat) and is a big talking point in Leeds. Home to our arts, design, architecture and built environment courses, it provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

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Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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Postgraduate Study - Application Steps

Once you've decided what course to study, here is a step-by-step guide of what to do next.

  • 1
    EXPLORE
    Explore your full range of options on our Online Prospectus at courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
    Call us on +44(0)113 812 3113 or email admissionsenquiries@leedsbeckett.ac.uk if you have any questions. International students can phone +44(0)113 812 1111 or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
  • 2
    POSTGRADUATE AND RESEARCH OPEN DAY
    Visit us for a Postgraduate and Research Open Day to speak to teaching staff and students, see our facilities and find out more about your chosen course. Alternatively, watch our online open day or register for a Virtual Q&A and ask our friendly staff any questions you may have.
  • 3
    APPLY

    Apply directly to us via our online application site *.

    * Exceptions to this are:

    • Teacher Training (PGCE & EYTS)
    • PG Dip Legal Practice PG Dip Law
    • Chartered Institute of PR (CIPR): Advanced Certificate & Advanced Diploma
    • MA Social Work
    • MA Art Psychotherapy
    • PGCert/PGDip/MA Play Therapy
  • 4
    YOUR OFFER
    Receive your offer - remember, the sooner you apply the sooner an offer can be made. Please note that certain courses do have set application deadlines so you should check before applying. Some courses may require you to attend an interview or submit a portfolio before an offer can be made.
  • 5
    SEND US YOUR RESULTS
    If we make you a conditional offer, send us your results as soon as you have these so we can confirm your place.
  • 6
    ACCOMMODATION
    Apply for our university accommodation if you need it.
  • 7
    INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
    Check visa regulations and apply for your CAS number if necessary.
  • 8
    FEES & FUNDING
    Discover more about your funding options and set up your fee payments.
  • 9
    ONLINE REGISTRATION & ENROLMENT
    Receive your online registration and enrolment information.
  • 10
    WELCOME WEEK
    Attend Welcome Week and begin your course.
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