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Sociology
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

Sociology

International Scholarships available

Overview

Develop your critical analytical and interpretive skills and forge a deeper understanding of the world around you. Through the examination of social theory, class, gender, culture, the media, globalisation and urban sociology, you will learn about changes and tensions in society and will come to recognise how and why they develop. You will complete a range of innovative and creative assessments and research-based assignments, and you will be able to pick from a variety of modules to shape your course to your career interests.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
Research Excellence Framework 2014: 40% of our research in the Psychology unit was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent.

Our careers advisors will be on hand to offer guidance on your future career and to help you recognise and sharpen your employability skills. This course will develop your transferable skills in team working, time management and written and oral communications. Our graduates have established rewarding careers in a variety of fields, including marketing, advertising, social work, teaching and with charity, voluntary and community groups.

You also have international exchange opportunities where you can study abroad. We place student support very highly and you will be allocated a personal tutor in your first year who you can contact at any time to discuss any issue.

90.5%
Student Satisfaction
Student Satisfaction*
*National Student Survey 2017

Course Features

  • Part-time study available
  • Specialist facilities
  • Study abroad option
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
  • 97.6% of students thought staff were good at explaining things (National Student Survey 2017).
  • 95.2% of students felt staff valued their views and opinions about the course (National Student Survey 2017).
  • 100% of graduates from the course are in work or further study six months after graduating (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2015-16).
Play BA (Hons) Sociology Video
BA (Hons) Sociology
Play BA (Hons) Sociology - Natalia Gerodetti, Course Director Video
BA (Hons) Sociology - Natalia Gerodetti, Course Director

Entry Requirements

104
POINTS REQUIRED
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
UCAS Tariff Points: 104 points required. (Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 104 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.
International Baccalaureate: 24 Points
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website.

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

UCAS Tariff Points:104 points required. (Minimum 64 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies).
If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.
Additional Requirements:
GCSEs:
GCSE English Language and Maths at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent. Key Skills Level 2, Functional Skills Level 2 and the Certificate in Adult Literacy/Numeracy are accepted in place of GCSEs.
Access to HE Diploma:
Pass overall with a minimum of 104 UCAS tariff points.
Scottish Awards:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade B at Higher Level.
Irish Leaving Certificate:
Minimum of 5 subjects at Grade C1 or above at Higher Level of which at least 3 must be at B2.
Selection Criteria:
We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.
International Baccalaureate: 24 Points
IELTS:
IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.
Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.


More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Vicky Maycock

Careers

Vicky Maycock
Claims Negotiator Fusion Insurance

BA (Hons) Criminology

“My course allowed me to increase my knowledge of fraud and insurance and enter a career I'm really interested in. My job requires me to investigate potential fraudulent claims and I find I'm able to understand them in-depth because of the specialist knowledge I gained on my degree.

Teaching and learning

Gain a critical understanding and appreciation of sociology. You will learn sociological theories and research, giving you the ability to apply sociological insights to help with social issues and problems. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
Download Course Spec Download
Explore the foundational understanding of sociological knowledge. You will study classic and contemporary theories on society, progress, modernity, class gender and ethnicity. You will learn how to engage effectively with sociological practice by practising your essay writing, reference, presentation and data analysis skills.
Overall workload
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222 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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978 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
100%
Core Modules

Focus on sociological theories engaged with the emergence and development of capitalism and modernity.

Study the interdisciplinary field of the study of space, the city, and urban identities from the perspective of sociology, cultural and human geography, politics and social psychology. You will explore the key elements and factors that distinguish the social and cultural characteristics of urban space and discusses the development of new forms of urbanisation in relation to debates about postmodernism and globalisation.

You will gain an understanding of both epistemological and methodological aspects of research process. The first part of the module introduces you to fundamental epistemological questions for the social and socio-psychological sciences. In the second part of the module you will focus on discussing key methods and techniques used in social scientific research, such as ethnographic method, semiotic and discourse analyses, and causal analysis.

Gain an introduction to sociological perspectives on media and culture and their relationship to social, political and economic life. You will look at the importance of understanding media and culture and think critically about the relationship between media, culture and identities in contemporary society.

Using an applied approach to sociological inquiries of and towards the city and urban contexts, you will develop your study skills, and focus in particular critical reading and thinking skills and both written and spoken communication skills.

Explore contemporary sociological theory and debates around the contested concept of globalisation. You will explore the characteristics of contemporary globalisation, consider the implications and consequences for different groups, and reflect on the tension between the global and the local (or the relationship between global social systems and localised everyday life).

Further your expertise on key modern social theory and concepts, focusing on class, gender and inequality, and the effect on social change has on the individual. You will be challenged to evaluate and assess the alternative perspectives within sociology.
Overall workload
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271 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
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930 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
7%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
93%
Core Modules

Investigate major topics and areas of debate in the sociology of gender. This will be achieved by considering feminist theories and theories of gender as well as by looking at key issues and debates around gender and work such as gender at work and family and work.

Gain a deeper insight into and training in a variety of social research methods. You will first consider the impact of values, politics and ethics on sociological research before moving on to examine a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods through in-depth examinations of specific pieces of sociological research.

Explore sociological perspectives on the role of political and economic power in the creation of social class divisions. You will examine the role of culture, education and the state in maintaining and entrenching class divisions.

Study classical and contemporary social theory. You will focus on some important classical modern theorists such as Marx and Weber and then show how these theories have been developed by social theorists in the 20th and 21st century.

Option modules may include:

Focus on a major specialism in sociology, and explore the relevance of the 'sociological imagination' to an understanding of patterns and experiences of health and illness, as well as issues in health care and health policy.

Conceptually or literally, you will take sociology out of the university and into the public sphere, encouraging you to engage in dialogue and collaboration with various publics so as to influence decision-making, social change and social justice.

Study both classical and contemporary theories of social movements, political protests, and episodes of collective action. You will explore and analyse empirical events using a range of theories, including but not limited to collective behaviour, resource mobilisation, political process and new social movement theories.

Explore and critically engage with the impact of digital technologies on social life, identity, politics and other areas of contemporary life. You will develop an understanding of, and assess, contemporary theories and studies which have sought to explain changes brought about by the increasing integration of the digital with everyday life.

Critically study contemporary urban inequalities. You will examine both the 'older' bases of urban inequality - access to land and property, gender inequity, ethnic and racial discrimination, legal exclusion and informality - as well as significant emerging patterns, including extreme concentrations of wealth at the top, middle-class stagnation, privatisation and spatial secession, and immigration and insecurity.

You will focus on contemporary social theory and the debates around the future direction of contemporary societies. You will also look at social policy debates particularly around the welfare state and its future. You will also choose from a variety of option modules, and pick an area of interest as you complete your dissertation.
Overall workload
Clock icon
141 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
1059 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Assessment proportions
Examination This could include a timed examination, take-away paper, formal presentation or viva-voce examination or a set exercise, quiz or multiple choice test.
20%
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
2%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
78%
Core Modules

Conduct an independent piece of research, 10,000 words in length, in which you demonstrate the ability to search and evaluate relevant academic literature and data, to apply the necessary and appropriate research skills for the production of a scholarly empirical or conceptual piece of work.

Explore the development of the British welfare state and examine it in terms of the divisions between public and private provision and the conflicting moral judgements that are applied. The ways in which these State interventions build upon and entrench class divisions are studied.

You will be encouraged to critically interrogate current social theory regarding the key features and characteristics of contemporary societies and their meaning and consequences. You will examine whether key social theories and models adequately describe contemporary societies or enhance our understanding of ongoing processes of social change.

Option modules may include:

Develop your knowledge of a range of different theoretical approaches to understanding masculinities. You will be introduced to a range of different ways of understanding masculinities and will develop your abilities in relating these theoretical approaches to a range of empirical topics.

Critically explore the intersection between science, technology, human bodies and health in contemporary societies. You will assess the ways in which methods of technical assessment have shaped how bodies and health are understood.

Gain an introduction to a number of sociological theories of communication and culture. You will explore the idea of social communication, language and visual culture from various angles, notably through contemporary cultural, social semiotic, post-modernist theories and frameworks.

You will integrate and deepen your sociological knowledge at a conceptual level by exploring key philosophical, theoretical and ethical issues at stake in the field to enable critical thinking.

Develop your understanding of the nature of work and organisations in the contemporary global economy. You will build the critical skills needed to understand key theoretical debates regarding new organisational and work-management techniques, new and emerging forms of labour and employment, and the complex and changing relationship between production, consumption and identity in an increasingly globalised economy.

Study a theoretical analysis of the significance of sexuality to contemporary society through a detailed exploration of historical and contemporary sites of struggle over sexual practices. Sexuality and sexual practices are considered an important social construct in contemporary society and you will explore this critically from an interdisciplinary social scientific perspective.

Explore how our identities, so often presented as a natural and eternal condition, are constructed for us by powerful forces of reproduction and representation, ones that blur the lines between fabricated and real, object and subject, outside and inside, in a process which at once helps to maintain social hierarchy and is largely beyond individual control.

Put food in a social context. From debates about how to feed the world and fast food v slow food to recent work on eating disorders and celebrity chefs, you will explore the contribution of sociology to exploring the production, distribution and consumption of food, in the UK and globally.

Leeds Beckett University
Dr Darren Nixon
Senior Lecturer

Dr Darren Nixon is Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Leeds Beckett University. His research interests centre on the sociology of work and particularly the interrelationships between work, gender, class and identity in the 'new economy'.

This course will develop your critical analytical and interpretive skills and thereby provide you with a deeper understanding of the world around you. Students can expect high-quality teaching from a strongly-committed and enthusiastic teaching team. Through a wide range of innovative and creative assessments and research-based assignments spread across the course, we aim to unleash students’ ‘sociological imagination’ and encourage you to take on the role of active ‘producers ‘of valid knowledge of the contemporary social world.
Play BA (Hons) Sociology Video
BA (Hons) Sociology
Play BA (Hons) Sociology - Natalia Gerodetti, Course Director Video
BA (Hons) Sociology - Natalia Gerodetti, Course Director

Fees & funding

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.
See further information on financing your studies or information about whether you may qualify for one of our Bursaries and Scholarships.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year).

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2018/19 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.
See further information on fees and finance on our Financing Your Studies webpage.

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

  • You will need to pay for two copies of your dissertation or final project to be bound

Course-specific optional costs

  • Travel, accommodation and subsistence for optional educational visits
    (The nature and cost of these visits will vary from year to year).

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets).

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

Facilities

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Clinical Skills Suite
    Clinical Skills Suite

    The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

  • Gym and Sports Facilities
    Gym and Sports Facilities

    Keeping fit is easy at Leeds Beckett - our fitness suites are easy to get to, kitted out with all the latest technology and available to all sports members.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

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