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Community Development
Undergraduate course
BA (Hons)

Youth Work and Community Development (JNC)

Youth Work and Community Development (JNC)

Youth Work and Community Development (JNC)

International Scholarships available

Overview

Locally, nationally and globally, young people and communities are having to deal with difficult and challenging situations. You will develop your understanding of social care and services for children and families through an extensive range of taught modules and completing 800 hours of assessed youth and community practice placements, as you build the expertise needed to transform people's lives for the better. You will have the opportunity to work with individuals and groups anywhere in the UK or overseas and gain a professional youth and community work qualification validated by the National Youth Agency (NYA) and recognised by the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC), which endorses professional qualifications for youth and community workers. You also have the opportunity to transfer to the BA (Hons) Working with Children, Young People & Families or BSc (Hons) Social Care, Justice & Recovery course on completion of your first year, without the need to repeat modules.

Validated by:

From rural communities to multi-cultural suburbs, studying in Leeds means you have access to a very diverse area for placement and future work opportunities. You will undertake placements in a wide variety of settings working with individual young people, groups or the wider community such as young offenders, drug services, environmental agencies and outdoor education centres. You will also have the chance to do a placement in India, South Africa or New York. Alternatively, you can set up your own placement in any area you wish.

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of in a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

Visit our Distance Learning Website
100%
students said their course provided opportunities to apply what they learnt*
*National Student Survey 2019

Course Features

  • Professional accreditations
  • Placements
  • Real-life projects
  • Study abroad option
  • Expert careers service
  • 24/7 Library
  • University accommodation
  • TEF Silver Award
BA (Hons) Youth Work and Community Development - Jo Bishop, Course Lecturer
Play BA (Hons) Youth Work and Community Development - Jo Bishop, Course Lecturer Video
BA (Hons) Youth Work and Community Development - Jo Bishop, Course Lecturer
Life in Leeds
Play Life in Leeds Video
Life in Leeds
 

Entry Requirements

64
POINTS REQUIRED

Places available on this course through Clearing. Please call us on 0113 812 3113 to discuss your qualifications, skills and experience. We are interested in hearing from students who are passionate about the subject and we will assess your application on a range of factors including, but not limited to, your performance in examinations and assessments.

UCAS Tariff Points: 64 points required. (Minimum 48 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies.).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

24 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ENHANCED CRIMINAL HISTORY CHECKS:

Satisfactory enhanced criminal history checks will be required by all applicants prior to acceptance on the course, (processed through the University only). The University is unable to accept DBS checks obtained through another institution (this includes those registered with the DBS Update Service); the checks undertaken by the University are appropriate to the course of study and relevant regulated activity placements. For important information on the UK Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check process click here.

SELF DECLARATION:

You will be asked to complete this online form as part of the DBS check process. You will be asked to identify on the self-declaration form if you have any cautions/convictions that would not be filtered out on a DBS certificate. For details on filtering, please click here. The form will also ask if you have resided outside of the UK after the age of 16, to establish if an Overseas Police Record check may be required.

Overseas Police Checks/Letter of Good Conduct

The DBS in the UK is currently not able to conduct overseas criminal record checks. International applicants; those without British Citizenship and British Citizens with a significant period of overseas residency of 12 months or more after the age of 16; therefore, require a criminal records check or certificate of good conduct from their home/overseas country(ies) prior to entry on to the course. A UK DBS check will also be required prior to enrolment; the DBS team will send you guidance on how to apply following your offer of a place. The application process and timeframes for Overseas Police checks can differ from country to country and so it is recommended that you start the process as soon as possible after you have been made a conditional/Unconditional offer to ensure you have enough lead in time to obtain the check prior to enrolment. For some countries, an individual can only apply in person and so it is preferable for those applicants still resident in the relevant country, to apply before entering the UK.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Mature Applicants
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu. If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website. Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Places available on this course through Clearing. Please call us on 0113 812 3113 to discuss your qualifications, skills and experience. We are interested in hearing from students who are passionate about the subject and we will assess your application on a range of factors including, but not limited to, your performance in examinations and assessments.

UCAS Tariff Points: 64 points required. (Minimum 48 from two A Levels or equivalent, excluding General Studies.).

If you're applying via UCAS, find out more about how your qualifications fit into the UCAS tariff.

GCSE English Language at Grade C or above (Grade 4 for those sitting their GCSE from 2017 onwards) or equivalent.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We may use selection criteria based on your personal attributes; experience and/or commitment to the area of study. This information will be derived from your personal statement and reference and will only be used if you have met the general entry requirements.

International Baccalaureate

24 Points

IELTS:

IELTS 6.0 with no skills below 5.5, or an equivalent qualification. The University provides excellent support for any applicant who may be required to undertake additional English language courses.

ENHANCED CRIMINAL HISTORY CHECKS:

Satisfactory enhanced criminal history checks will be required by all applicants prior to acceptance on the course, (processed through the University only). The University is unable to accept DBS checks obtained through another institution (this includes those registered with the DBS Update Service); the checks undertaken by the University are appropriate to the course of study and relevant regulated activity placements. For important information on the UK Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check process click here.

SELF DECLARATION:

You will be asked to complete this online form as part of the DBS check process. You will be asked to identify on the self-declaration form if you have any cautions/convictions that would not be filtered out on a DBS certificate. For details on filtering, please click here. The form will also ask if you have resided outside of the UK after the age of 16, to establish if an Overseas Police Record check may be required.

Overseas Police Checks/Letter of Good Conduct

The DBS in the UK is currently not able to conduct overseas criminal record checks. International applicants; those without British Citizenship and British Citizens with a significant period of overseas residency of 12 months or more after the age of 16; therefore, require a criminal records check or certificate of good conduct from their home/overseas country(ies) prior to entry on to the course. A UK DBS check will also be required prior to enrolment; the DBS team will send you guidance on how to apply following your offer of a place. The application process and timeframes for Overseas Police checks can differ from country to country and so it is recommended that you start the process as soon as possible after you have been made a conditional/Unconditional offer to ensure you have enough lead in time to obtain the check prior to enrolment. For some countries, an individual can only apply in person and so it is preferable for those applicants still resident in the relevant country, to apply before entering the UK.

ADDITIONAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:

Verify your qualifications
If you are an international student, we can help you to compare and verify your qualifications. Please contact our International Office on +44 (0)113 812 1111 09.00 to 17.00 Mon-Thurs / 09.00 to 16.30 Fri GMT or email internationaloffice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
Need to improve your English Language skills?
Don't worry if you don't have the level of English required for your chosen course. We offer a wide range of courses which have been designed to help you to improve your qualifications and English language ability, most of which are accredited by the British Council. Check your English and find out more about our English courses.
More questions?
No matter what your questions, we are here to answer them, visit our International website to get more information and find out about our online open days.

Careers

Amanda Croft

Careers

Amanda Croft
Youth and Family Support Practitioner East Riding of Yorkshire Council

BA (Hons) Youth Work & Community Development (JNC)

“"My course placement opportunities were invaluable. They helped me realise my career goals and how important and powerful youth and community work can be. I learned about the differences in people and how to respect diverse opinions and choices. The experience on my placements alongside my academic progression has helped me achieve my perfect job."

Teaching and learning

Gain the expertise required to become a youth work and community development worker, while meeting the skills and values demanded by the National Youth Agency's Professional Validation and Curriculum Requirements. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.
Download 2019/20 Course Spec Download
Explore the key skills to approach your degree with confidence including social justice, politics of everyday life and human development, and engage in 100 hours of work-related learning in a setting involving children, young people or families. You will study with students on similar courses within our School portfolio, enhancing your interprofessional experience.
Overall workload
Clock icon
210 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
890 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
100 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
18%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
82%
Core Modules

Transition into higher education by developing the academic and professional skills necessary to successfully complete the course and become competent practitioners in a social care setting. You will be introduced to a range of skills which include: study skills, reflection, communication, working to deadlines, management of self and independent learning.

Study the knowledge concerning physical, psychological and psychosocial development across the human life course, in a political, cultural, economic and environmental context.

Develop your understanding of multiple inequalities and the way that these limit choices and opportunities for individuals, groups and communities. This engages you in contemporary debates that surround social justice, diversity and inequality in a broad inter disciplinary network of health, criminal justice, housing, addiction, and welfare services.

Gain an understanding of the qualities and skills needed for effective communication and engagement skills for practice. You will explore key aspects of verbal and non-verbal communication and relate them to established therapeutic techniques and communication skills theory.

Examine how politics impacts on everyday life and seek to gain an understanding of how globalisation affects and shapes political organisation(s) and this effect on young people, families and their communities.

Understand the foundations for successful employability and to consider how volunteering can provide an environment for learning. You will develop a wide range of personal and professional skills.

Focus more on the specific disciplines within youth work and community development. You will be encouraged to design, deliver and validate informal education activities to young people and community members. Option modules will allow you to develop these skills in areas of practice such as drama and creative arts, health and wellbeing and outdoor activities.
Overall workload
Clock icon
156 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
719 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
325 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
66%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
34%
Core Modules

You will learn the basic approaches of social research, helping you to foster critical thinking and research skills, and examine ethical research considerations and prepare to become a practitioner researchers.

Study a range of theoretical approaches which inform youth and community work and the historical and ideological debates that influence youth and community work practice.

Engage in a minimum of 325 hours assessed professional practice. Taught input will focus on the placement process and introducing students to the knowledge and skills involved in delivering informal education and facilitating learning. Students are required to plan, deliver and evaluate a `programme of intervention? which is initially `rehearsed? in the classroom and then delivered to individuals/groups in practice.

Explore the concept of community and examine the ideas, perspectives and approaches of critical thinkers and writers/practitioners. You will study contemporary issues that impact on communities such as Preventing Violent Extremism, Forced migration, Brexit, Poverty and Inequality and Environmental concerns. In a second section, you will investigate in more depth community development ? both as a set of National Occupational Standards and as a distinctive practice that sits alongside youth work. Learn how to facilitate community research, collaborative partnership work and promote community learning that creates meaningful social change.

Option modules may include:

Enhance your awareness of models and approaches used in health initiatives, with particular focus on the relevance for use in informal education. You will consider health in a global context, but also focus on work in the UK. You will be enabled to develop creative ways of working with people around issues of health.

Develop your critical awareness and promote a better understanding of the socially complex issues practitioners face within community practice. You will have the opportunity to explore key contemporary debates within youth, social care, justice, recovery and family services in an academic, critical and informed manner.

Build on your awareness of models and creative approaches used in engaging individuals and groups through drama and creative arts. You will develop creative ways of working around a range of issues.

You will develop your awareness of models and approaches used working in the outdoors with young people, with a particular focus on the relevance of outdoor activities for use in a youth work setting.

In Year Three your learning will concentrate on leading and managing practice. You will conceive and draft a real-life funding bid to develop your research and entrepreneurial skills, and undertake work-related learning focusing in management and leadership. You will gain a global outlook and a deeper multidisciplinary understanding of youth work and community development, to ready you for the world of work and to enable you to see the bigger picture.
Overall workload
Clock icon
150 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
475 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
575 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
32%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
68%
Core Modules

Explore the concept of globalisation and locate global forces within contemporary practice. You will critically explore the impact of globalisation on local practice, with reference to themes such as economics, migration and conflict.

Build on your understanding of the social, political, economic and cultural issues that impact upon contemporary family life and increase your knowledge of evidence-based practice to promote the well-being of children and young people and support families.

Foster your skills, familiarity, and confidence to enable you to take on personal and organisational responsibilities. In a workplace context, you are equipped with knowledge and practice in management, leadership and motivation approaches whilst at an individual level gaining insights into their own styles, preferences and experiences. The aim is to enable you to be able to make choices about how you work to get the best from yourself and others at work. On completing the module you'll have developed skills and techniques to become effective day to day managers and innovative leaders.

Undertake a minimum of 325 hours' assessed professional practice. You will critically apply your academic learning and demonstrate a high level of practice informed by the values, ethics, principles and National Occupational Standards of Youth Work, and core standards of Community Development Work.

Study an area of practice in depth and demonstrate an understanding of the relevant social, economic and political context impacting on that particular practice. You will utilise skills developed in the Year 2 research module which introduces the basic approaches of social research and helped you foster critical thinking and research skills, informed by an ethical approach consistent with your professional value-base.

Download 2020/21 Course Spec Download
Explore the key skills to approach your degree with confidence including social justice, politics of everyday life and human development, and engage in 100 hours of work-related learning in a setting involving children, young people or families. You will study with students on similar courses within our School portfolio, enhancing your interprofessional experience.
Overall workload
Clock icon
210 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
890 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
100 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
18%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
82%
Core Modules

Transition into higher education by developing the academic and professional skills necessary to successfully complete the course and become competent practitioners in a social care setting. You will be introduced to a range of skills which include: study skills, reflection, communication, working to deadlines, management of self and independent learning.

Understand the foundations for successful employability and to consider how volunteering can provide an environment for learning. You will develop a wide range of personal and professional skills.

Study the knowledge concerning physical, psychological and psychosocial development across the human life course, in a political, cultural, economic and environmental context.

Develop your understanding of multiple inequalities and the way that these limit choices and opportunities for individuals, groups and communities. This engages you in contemporary debates that surround social justice, diversity and inequality in a broad inter disciplinary network of health, criminal justice, housing, addiction, and welfare services.

Gain an understanding of the qualities and skills needed for effective communication and engagement skills for practice. You will explore key aspects of verbal and non-verbal communication and relate them to established therapeutic techniques and communication skills theory.

Examine how politics impacts on everyday life and seek to gain an understanding of how globalisation affects and shapes political organisation(s) and this effect on young people, families and their communities.

Focus more on the specific disciplines within youth work and community development. You will be encouraged to design, deliver and validate informal education activities to young people and community members. Option modules will allow you to develop these skills in areas of practice such as drama and creative arts, health and wellbeing and outdoor activities.
Overall workload
Clock icon
156 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
719 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
325 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
66%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
34%
Core Modules

Explore the concept of community and examine the ideas, perspectives and approaches of critical thinkers and writers/practitioners. You will study contemporary issues that impact on communities such as Preventing Violent Extremism, Forced migration, Brexit, Poverty and Inequality and Environmental concerns. In a second section, you will investigate in more depth community development ? both as a set of National Occupational Standards and as a distinctive practice that sits alongside youth work. Learn how to facilitate community research, collaborative partnership work and promote community learning that creates meaningful social change.

Engage in a minimum of 325 hours assessed professional practice. Taught input will focus on the placement process and introducing students to the knowledge and skills involved in delivering informal education and facilitating learning. Students are required to plan, deliver and evaluate a `programme of intervention? which is initially `rehearsed? in the classroom and then delivered to individuals/groups in practice.

Study a range of theoretical approaches which inform youth and community work and the historical and ideological debates that influence youth and community work practice.

You will learn the basic approaches of social research, helping you to foster critical thinking and research skills, and examine ethical research considerations and prepare to become a practitioner researchers.

Option modules may include:

Build on your awareness of models and creative approaches used in engaging individuals and groups through drama and creative arts. You will develop creative ways of working around a range of issues.

You will develop your awareness of models and approaches used working in the outdoors with young people, with a particular focus on the relevance of outdoor activities for use in a youth work setting.

Enhance your awareness of models and approaches used in health initiatives, with particular focus on the relevance for use in informal education. You will consider health in a global context, but also focus on work in the UK. You will be enabled to develop creative ways of working with people around issues of health.

Develop your critical awareness and promote a better understanding of the socially complex issues practitioners face within community practice. You will have the opportunity to explore key contemporary debates within youth, social care, justice, recovery and family services in an academic, critical and informed manner.

In Year Three your learning will concentrate on leading and managing practice. You will conceive and draft a real-life funding bid to develop your research and entrepreneurial skills, and undertake work-related learning focusing in management and leadership. You will gain a global outlook and a deeper multidisciplinary understanding of youth work and community development, to ready you for the world of work and to enable you to see the bigger picture.
Overall workload
Clock icon
150 hours Teaching and learning Typically, this will include lectures, seminars, tutorials, supervised studio time or laboratory time and one-to-one meetings with your personal tutor.
Clock icon
475 hours Independent study This is the time outside your timetabled hours when you will be expected to continue learning independently. Typically, this will involve reading, research, completing assignments, preparing presentations and exam revision.
Clock icon
575 hours Placements Some modules will give you the opportunity to undertake a work placement. These hours will be spent working in industry, gaining practical knowledge and professional skills that can be valuable to employers.
Indicative assessment proportions (based on 2018/19)
Practical This is an invigilated assessment of your practical skills and competencies, such as delivering a coaching session, or a school experience if you are training to be a teacher.
32%
Coursework This could include essays, reports or other written assignments, a dissertation or project, or a portfolio of your work. Assessed work will normally be returned with feedback within four weeks of your submission. When you begin your course, you will be provided with a module handbook for your chosen modules which will provide specific guidelines on how and when you will receive that feedback.
68%
Core Modules

Study an area of practice in depth and demonstrate an understanding of the relevant social, economic and political context impacting on that particular practice. You will utilise skills developed in the Year 2 research module which introduces the basic approaches of social research and helped you foster critical thinking and research skills, informed by an ethical approach consistent with your professional value-base.

Build on your understanding of the social, political, economic and cultural issues that impact upon contemporary family life and increase your knowledge of evidence-based practice to promote the well-being of children and young people and support families.

Foster your skills, familiarity, and confidence to enable you to take on personal and organisational responsibilities. In a workplace context, you are equipped with knowledge and practice in management, leadership and motivation approaches whilst at an individual level gaining insights into their own styles, preferences and experiences. The aim is to enable you to be able to make choices about how you work to get the best from yourself and others at work. On completing the module you'll have developed skills and techniques to become effective day to day managers and innovative leaders.

Undertake a minimum of 325 hours' assessed professional practice. You will critically apply your academic learning and demonstrate a high level of practice informed by the values, ethics, principles and National Occupational Standards of Youth Work, and core standards of Community Development Work.

Explore the concept of globalisation and locate global forces within contemporary practice. You will critically explore the impact of globalisation on local practice, with reference to themes such as economics, migration and conflict.

Dr Erika Laredo
Dr Erika Laredo
Senior Lecturer
The skills you leave with enable you to challenge preconceptions about young people, so you feel confident and passionate in the work you do. You will be empathetic, effective practitioners.
BA (Hons) Youth Work and Community Development - Jo Bishop, Course Lecturer
Play BA (Hons) Youth Work and Community Development - Jo Bishop, Course Lecturer Video
BA (Hons) Youth Work and Community Development - Jo Bishop, Course Lecturer
Life in Leeds
Play Life in Leeds Video
Life in Leeds
 

Fees & funding

Fees information is not available for this selection of attendance, location and start date. Please re-select.

The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £9250. The amount you will pay may increase each year to take into account the effects of inflation.

Additional course costs

Tuition fees
Your tuition fees cover the cost of registration, tuition, academic supervision, assessments and examinations.
The following are also included in the cost of your course:

  • 24/7 Library and student IT support
  • Free wifi via eduroam
  • Skills workshops and resources
  • Library membership, giving access to more than 500,000 printed, multimedia and digital resources
  • Access to software, including five free copies of Microsoft Office 365 to install on your PC, laptop and MAC, and access to free high-end software via the Leeds Beckett remote app
  • Loan of high-end media equipment to support your studies

Course specific

  • Access to the Clinical Skills Suite with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Additional costs
In many cases, costs associated with your course will be included in your course fee. However, in some cases there are ‘essential’ additional costs (those that you will be required to meet in addition to your course fee), and/or ‘optional’ additional costs (costs that are not required, but that you might choose to pay). We have included those essential or optional additional costs that relate to your course, below.

Course-specific essentials

Placements
The University makes a financial contribution to travel expenses for placements, but students may need to pay towards their own travel expenses beyond this. Travel expenses thresholds are tiered dependent on the location of the placement. Students can claim public transport receipted costs as follows: regional travel up to £300, national travel up to £500, international placement travel up to £750. Any costs above those limits are incurred by the student.

Students are able to choose a placement location or secure one themselves that may be convenient for travel.

Course-specific optional costs

Books: £100, or available on loan from library. Ebooks are available for some key texts.

Educational overseas visit: Flights and accommodation costs for the optional educational visit are subsidised and maximum student contribution will be no more than £200.

Volunteering or relevant work experience: Undertaking 100 hours of required volunteering (or paid work) in the first year, may incur travel costs.

Other study-related expenses to consider: books (the library stocks books from your module reading list but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery; field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations); PC/laptop (provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library. However, you may prefer to have your own); mobile phone/tablet (to access University online services); academic conferences (travel costs); professional-body membership (where applicable); and graduation (gown hire and guest tickets). 

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

 


The tuition fee for the year for students entering in 2019/20 is £12000. The amount you will pay is fixed at this level for each year of your course.

The tuition fee rates for undergraduate applicants, commencing their course in the 2020/21 academic year, are yet to be set at this time by the UK Government. We expect these fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.

Additional course costs

Course-specific essentials

Placements
The University makes a financial contribution to travel expenses for placements, but students may need to pay towards their own travel expenses beyond this. Travel expenses thresholds are tiered dependent on the location of the placement. Students can claim public transport receipted costs as follows: regional travel up to £300, national travel up to £500, international placement travel up to £750. Any costs above those limits are incurred by the student.

Students are able to choose a placement location or secure one themselves that may be convenient for travel. 

Course-specific optional costs

Books: £100, or available on loan from library. Ebooks are available for some key texts.

Educational overseas visit: Flights and accommodation costs for the optional educational visit are subsidised and maximum student contribution will be no more than £300.

Volunteering or relevant work experience: Undertaking 100 hours of required volunteering (or paid work) in the first year, may incur travel costs that you will need to cover.

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: such as 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

 

The tuition fees for this course, for applicants commencing their course in the 202021 academic year, are yet to be set at this time. These fee rates will be set in October 2019. Should you wish to view the fee charges for this course for the previous year you can do so by changing the entry point to September 2019 in the 'Start Date' section of this page above.

Additional course costs

Course-specific essentials

Placements
The University makes a financial contribution to travel expenses for placements, but students may need to pay towards their own travel expenses beyond this. Travel expenses thresholds are tiered dependent on the location of the placement. Students can claim public transport receipted costs as follows: regional travel up to £300, national travel up to £500, international placement travel up to £750. Any costs above those limits are incurred by the student.

Students are able to choose a placement location or secure one themselves that may be convenient for travel. 

Course-specific optional costs

Books: £100, or available on loan from library. Ebooks are available for some key texts.

Educational overseas visit: Flights and accommodation costs for the optional educational visit are subsidised and maximum student contribution will be no more than £300.

Volunteering or relevant work experience: Undertaking 100 hours of required volunteering (or paid work) in the first year, may incur travel costs that you will need to cover.

Other study-related expenses to consider: materials that you will need to complete your course such as books (the library stocks books from your module reading list and can order books from other locations for you if a copy isn’t available but you may wish to purchase copies for yourself); placement costs (these may include travel expenses and living costs); student visas (international students only); printing, photocopying and stationery (you will need to pay for multiple copies of your dissertation or final project to be printed and bound); events associated with your course such as field trips; study abroad opportunities (travel costs and accommodation, visas and immunisations). Other costs could include academic conferences (travel costs) and professional-body membership (where applicable). The costs you will need to cover for graduation will include gown hire and guest tickets, and optional extras such as professional photography.

You may prefer to have your own mobile phone/tablet (to access university online services) but you can book and borrow AV equipment through the media equipment service accessed online via the student hub and located in the library at each campus. Equipment includes: such as 360 Cameras, iPads, GoPros, MacBooks, portable data projectors, portable projection screens, flipchart stands, remote presenters, digital cameras and camcorders, SLR cameras, speakers, microphones, headphones, headsets, tripods, digital audio recorders and PC/laptops (a laptop loans service is provided on campus in social learning spaces and in the library on both campuses). Student laptops are also available from the laptop lockers located on the ground floor of the libraries.

This list is not exhaustive and costs will vary depending on the choices you make during your course. Any rental, travel or living costs are also in addition to your course fees.

 

Facilities

  • Library
    Library

    Our Library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, every day of the year, providing you with access to specialist books and journals, learning spaces, computers, multimedia facilities and media equipment hire. Tens of thousands of our Library's digital resources, including ebooks, ejournals and databases, can be accessed online at a time and place to suit you.

  • Clinical Skills Suite
    Clinical Skills Suite

    The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

  • Gym and Sports Facilities
    Gym and Sports Facilities

    Keeping fit is easy at Leeds Beckett - our fitness suites are easy to get to, kitted out with all the latest technology and available to all sports members.

Location

City Campus

City Campus

It is not every university that can offer you the chance to study in the best tall building in the world. But we can. Our City Campus is home to such award-winning learning environments as Broadcasting Place, voted best tall building in the world in 2010. Other buildings include the Rose Bowl, home to our Business School, which was awarded Best Commercial Property Development in the 2009 Yorkshire Property awards. Just over the road from the Rose Bowl is the Leslie Silver building which houses one of our impressive libraries across five floors. The library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

View in Google Maps

Want to know more?

Start exploring

We host a range of on campus and virtual open days throughout the year, giving you the opportunity to discover life at Leeds Beckett University. Find out more about your course, financing your studies, our range of accommodation and the vibrant city of Leeds.

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